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dc.contributor.authorLydsdottir, Linda B
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Louise M
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, Halldora
dc.contributor.authorThome, Marga
dc.contributor.authorTyrfingsson, Petur
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Jon F
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-28T10:15:21Z
dc.date.available2014-08-28T10:15:21Z
dc.date.issued2014-04
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.citationJ Clin Psychiatry 2014, 75 (4):393-8en
dc.identifier.issn1555-2101
dc.identifier.pmid24569071
dc.identifier.doi10.4088/JCP.13m08646
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/325507
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractFew studies are available on the effectiveness of screening tools such as the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in pregnancy or the extent to which such tools may identify women with mental disorders other than depression. We therefore aimed to investigate the mental health characteristics of pregnant women who screen positive on the EPDS.
dc.description.abstractConsecutive women receiving antenatal care in primary care clinics (from November 2006 to July 2011) were invited to complete the EPDS in week 16 of pregnancy. All women who scored above 11 (screen positive) on the EPDS and randomly selected women who scored below 12 (screen negative) were invited to participate in a psychiatric diagnostic interview.
dc.description.abstract2,411 women completed the EPDS. Two hundred thirty-three women (9.7%) were screened positive in week 16, of whom 153 (66%) agreed to a psychiatric diagnostic interview. Forty-eight women (31.4%) were diagnosed with major depressive disorder according to DSM-IV criteria, 20 (13.1%) with bipolar disorder, 93 (60.8%) with anxiety disorders (including 27 [17.6%] with obsessive-compulsive disorder [OCD]), 8 (5.2%) with dysthymia, 18 (11.8%) with somatoform disorder, 3 (2%) with an eating disorder, and 7 (4.6%) with current substance abuse. Women who screened positive were significantly more likely to have psychosocial risk factors, including being unemployed (χ(2)(1) = 23.37, P ≤.001), lower educational status (χ(2)(1)= 31.68, P ≤ .001), and a history of partner violence (χ(2)(1) = 10.30, P ≤ 001), compared with the women who screened negative.
dc.description.abstractUse of the EPDS early in the second trimester of pregnancy identifies a substantial number of women with potentially serious mental disorders other than depression, including bipolar disorder, OCD, and eating disorders. A comprehensive clinical assessment is therefore necessary following use of the EPDS during pregnancy to ensure that women who screen positive receive appropriate mental health management.
dc.description.sponsorshipIcelandic Centre for Research (RANNIS) University of Iceland Research Fund Landspitali-University Hospital Research Fund Wyeth Research Fund National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Research Professorship NIHR-RP-R3-12-011 NIHR Mental Health Biomedical Research Centre at South London Maudsley National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust King's College Londonen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhysicians Postgraduate Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.13m08646en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.psychiatrist.com/JCP/article/_layouts/ppp.psych.controls/BinaryViewer.ashx?Article=/JCP/article/Pages/2014/v75n04/v75n0416.aspx&Type=Article#page=1&zoom=auto,-87,783en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of clinical psychiatryen
dc.subjectÞunglyndien
dc.subjectLyfjameðferðen
dc.subjectMeðgangaen
dc.subjectÞunglyndislyfen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAntidepressive Agents/therapeutic useen
dc.subject.meshDepression/complicationsen
dc.subject.meshDepression, Postpartum/diagnosisen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications/diagnosisen
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales*en
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.subject.meshDepression/diagnosis*en
dc.subject.meshDepression/drug therapyen
dc.subject.meshDepression/psychologyen
dc.subject.meshDepression, Postpartum/psychologyen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications/drug therapyen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications/psychology*en
dc.titleThe mental health characteristics of pregnant women with depressive symptoms identified by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Fac Nursing, Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Mental Hlth Serv, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland, Reykjavik Univ, Sch Business, Reykjavik, Iceland, Kings Coll London, Sect Womens Mental Hlth, Inst Psychiat, London WC2R 2LS, Englanden
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of clinical psychiatryen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractFew studies are available on the effectiveness of screening tools such as the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in pregnancy or the extent to which such tools may identify women with mental disorders other than depression. We therefore aimed to investigate the mental health characteristics of pregnant women who screen positive on the EPDS.
html.description.abstractConsecutive women receiving antenatal care in primary care clinics (from November 2006 to July 2011) were invited to complete the EPDS in week 16 of pregnancy. All women who scored above 11 (screen positive) on the EPDS and randomly selected women who scored below 12 (screen negative) were invited to participate in a psychiatric diagnostic interview.
html.description.abstract2,411 women completed the EPDS. Two hundred thirty-three women (9.7%) were screened positive in week 16, of whom 153 (66%) agreed to a psychiatric diagnostic interview. Forty-eight women (31.4%) were diagnosed with major depressive disorder according to DSM-IV criteria, 20 (13.1%) with bipolar disorder, 93 (60.8%) with anxiety disorders (including 27 [17.6%] with obsessive-compulsive disorder [OCD]), 8 (5.2%) with dysthymia, 18 (11.8%) with somatoform disorder, 3 (2%) with an eating disorder, and 7 (4.6%) with current substance abuse. Women who screened positive were significantly more likely to have psychosocial risk factors, including being unemployed (χ(2)(1) = 23.37, P ≤.001), lower educational status (χ(2)(1)= 31.68, P ≤ .001), and a history of partner violence (χ(2)(1) = 10.30, P ≤ 001), compared with the women who screened negative.
html.description.abstractUse of the EPDS early in the second trimester of pregnancy identifies a substantial number of women with potentially serious mental disorders other than depression, including bipolar disorder, OCD, and eating disorders. A comprehensive clinical assessment is therefore necessary following use of the EPDS during pregnancy to ensure that women who screen positive receive appropriate mental health management.


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