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dc.contributor.authorQiu, Chengxuan
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Sigurdur
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Qian
dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Maria K
dc.contributor.authorKjartansson, Olafur
dc.contributor.authorEiriksdottir, Gudny
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Melissa E
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Tamara B
dc.contributor.authorvan Buchem, Mark A
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.contributor.authorLauner, Lenore J
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-01T11:14:54Z
dc.date.available2014-09-01T11:14:54Z
dc.date.issued2014-01
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.citationAnn. Neurol. 2014, 75 (1):138-46en
dc.identifier.issn1531-8249
dc.identifier.pmid24243491
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ana.24063
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/325587
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractWe investigated whether, and the extent to which, vascular and degenerative lesions in the brain mediate the association of diabetes with poor cognitive performance.
dc.description.abstractThis cross-sectional study included 4,206 participants (age > 65 years; 57.8% women) of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. Data were collected through interview, clinical examination, psychological testing, and laboratory tests. The composite scores on memory, information-processing speed, and executive function were derived from a cognitive test battery. Markers of cerebral macrovascular (cortical infarcts), microvascular (subcortical infarcts, cerebral microbleeds, and higher white matter lesion volume), and neurodegenerative (lower gray matter, normal white matter, and total brain tissue volumes) processes were assessed on magnetic resonance images. Mediation models were employed to test the mediating effect of brain lesions on the association of diabetes with cognitive performance controlling for potential confounders.
dc.description.abstractThere were 462 (11.0%) persons with diabetes. Diabetes was significantly associated with lower scores on processing speed and executive function, but not with memory function. Diabetes was significantly associated with all markers of brain pathology. All of these markers were significantly associated with lower scores on memory, processing speed, and executive function. Formal mediation tests suggested that markers of cerebrovascular and degenerative pathology significantly mediated the associations of diabetes with processing speed and executive function.
dc.description.abstractDiabetes is associated with poor performance on cognitive tests of information-processing speed and executive function. The association is largely mediated by markers of both neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular disease. Older people with diabetes should be monitored for cognitive problems and brain lesions.
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH/National Institute on Aging (NIA) /N01-AG-12100 NIA, USA Icelandic Heart Association Icelandic Parliament, Iceland Swedish Research Council Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Swedenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.24063en
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ana.24063/pdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Annals of neurologyen
dc.subjectSykursýkien
dc.subjectHeilinnen
dc.subjectElliglöpen
dc.subjectMinnien
dc.subjectÍslanden
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshAgingen
dc.subject.meshBrainen
dc.subject.meshBrain Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshCognitionen
dc.subject.meshCognition Disordersen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitusen
dc.subject.meshDisease Susceptibilityen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.titleDiabetes, markers of brain pathology and cognitive function: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA, Stockholm Univ, Aging Res Ctr, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Karolinska Inst, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden, Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Fac Psychol, Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Radiol, Reykjavik, Iceland, Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Radiol, Leiden, Netherlands, Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of neurologyen
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
html.description.abstractWe investigated whether, and the extent to which, vascular and degenerative lesions in the brain mediate the association of diabetes with poor cognitive performance.
html.description.abstractThis cross-sectional study included 4,206 participants (age > 65 years; 57.8% women) of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. Data were collected through interview, clinical examination, psychological testing, and laboratory tests. The composite scores on memory, information-processing speed, and executive function were derived from a cognitive test battery. Markers of cerebral macrovascular (cortical infarcts), microvascular (subcortical infarcts, cerebral microbleeds, and higher white matter lesion volume), and neurodegenerative (lower gray matter, normal white matter, and total brain tissue volumes) processes were assessed on magnetic resonance images. Mediation models were employed to test the mediating effect of brain lesions on the association of diabetes with cognitive performance controlling for potential confounders.
html.description.abstractThere were 462 (11.0%) persons with diabetes. Diabetes was significantly associated with lower scores on processing speed and executive function, but not with memory function. Diabetes was significantly associated with all markers of brain pathology. All of these markers were significantly associated with lower scores on memory, processing speed, and executive function. Formal mediation tests suggested that markers of cerebrovascular and degenerative pathology significantly mediated the associations of diabetes with processing speed and executive function.
html.description.abstractDiabetes is associated with poor performance on cognitive tests of information-processing speed and executive function. The association is largely mediated by markers of both neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular disease. Older people with diabetes should be monitored for cognitive problems and brain lesions.


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