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dc.contributor.authorBrehony, Carina
dc.contributor.authorTrotter, Caroline L
dc.contributor.authorRamsay, Mary E
dc.contributor.authorChandra, Manosree
dc.contributor.authorJolley, Keith A
dc.contributor.authorvan der Ende, Arie
dc.contributor.authorCarion, Françoise
dc.contributor.authorBerthelsen, Lene
dc.contributor.authorHoffmann, Steen
dc.contributor.authorHarðardóttir, Hjördís
dc.contributor.authorVazquez, Julio A
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Karen
dc.contributor.authorToropainen, Maija
dc.contributor.authorCaniça, Manuela
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, Eugenia
dc.contributor.authorDiggle, Mathew
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Giles F
dc.contributor.authorTaha, Muhamed-Kheir
dc.contributor.authorStefanelli, Paola
dc.contributor.authorKriz, Paula
dc.contributor.authorGray, Steve J
dc.contributor.authorFox, Andrew J
dc.contributor.authorJacobsson, Susanne
dc.contributor.authorClaus, Heike
dc.contributor.authorVogel, Ulrich
dc.contributor.authorTzanakaki, Georgina
dc.contributor.authorHeuberger, Sigrid
dc.contributor.authorCaugant, Dominique A
dc.contributor.authorFrosch, Matthias
dc.contributor.authorMaiden, Martin C J
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-11T10:10:20Z
dc.date.available2014-09-11T10:10:20Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.citationClin. Vaccine Immunol. 2014, 21 (6):847-53en
dc.identifier.issn1556-679X
dc.identifier.pmid24695776
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/CVI.00133-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/326055
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access.en
dc.description.abstractNew vaccines targeting meningococci expressing serogroup B polysaccharide have been developed, with some being licensed in Europe. Coverage depends on the distribution of disease-associated genotypes, which may vary by age. It is well established that a small number of hyperinvasive lineages account for most disease, and these lineages are associated with particular antigens, including vaccine candidates. A collection of 4,048 representative meningococcal disease isolates from 18 European countries, collected over a 3-year period, were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Age data were available for 3,147 isolates. The proportions of hyperinvasive lineages, identified as particular clonal complexes (ccs) by MLST, differed among age groups. Subjects <1 year of age experienced lower risk of sequence type 11 (ST-11) cc, ST-32 cc, and ST-269 cc disease and higher risk of disease due to unassigned STs, 1- to 4-year-olds experienced lower risk of ST-11 cc and ST-32 cc disease, 5- to 14-year-olds were less likely to experience ST-11 cc and ST-269 cc disease, and ≥25-year-olds were more likely to experience disease due to less common ccs and unassigned STs. Younger and older subjects were vulnerable to a more diverse set of genotypes, indicating the more clonal nature of genotypes affecting adolescents and young adults. Knowledge of temporal and spatial diversity and the dynamics of meningococcal populations is essential for disease control by vaccines, as coverage is lineage specific. The nonrandom age distribution of hyperinvasive lineages has consequences for the design and implementation of vaccines, as different variants, or perhaps targets, may be required for different age groups.
dc.description.sponsorshipWellcome Trust European Unionen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmer Soc Microbiologyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CVI.00133-14en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4054250/en
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.subjectSmitsjúkdómaren
dc.subjectHeilahimnubólgaen
dc.subjectBólusetningaren
dc.subjectForvarnir (sjúkdómar)en
dc.subject.meshMeningococcal Infections/prevention & control*en
dc.subject.meshNeisseria meningitidis, Serogroup Ben
dc.subject.meshMeningococcal Vaccines/administration & dosageen
dc.subject.meshGenetic Variationen
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologyen
dc.titleImplications of differential age distribution of disease-associated meningococcal lineages for vaccine development.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Oxford, Dept Zool, Oxford OX1 3PS, England, Univ Cambridge, Dept Vet Med, Cambridge, England, Publ Hlth England, London, England, Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Med Microbiol, Netherlands Reference Lab Bacterial Meningitis, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands, Sci Inst Publ Hlth, Meningococcal Reference Lab, Brussels, Belgium, Statens Serum Inst, Neisseria & Streptococcus Reference Lab, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark, Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Microbiol, Reykjavik, Iceland, Meningococcal Reference Lab, Madrid, Spain, Irish Meningococcal & Meningitis Reference Lab, Dublin, Ireland, Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Helsinki, Finland, Natl Inst Hlth Dr Ricardo Jorge, Dept Infect Dis, Lab Antimicrobial Resistance, Lisbon, Portugal, Scottish Haemophilus Legionella Meningococcus & P, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland, Inst Pasteur, Natl Reference Ctr Meningococci, Paris, France, Ist Super Sanita, Dept Infect Parasit & Immune Mediated Dis, I-00161 Rome, Italy, Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Natl Reference Lab Meningococcal Infect, Prague, Czech Republic, Manchester Royal Infirm, Meningococcal Reference Unit, Manchester M13 9WL, Lancs, England, Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Lab Med, Natl Reference Lab Pathogen Neisseria, Orebro, Sweden, Inst Hyg & Mikrobiol, Wurzburg, Germany, Natl Sch Publ Hlth, Natl Meningococcal Reference Lab, Athens, Greece, Inst Med Microbiol & Hyg, Natl Reference Ctr Meningococci, Graz, Austria, Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Dept Bacteriol & Immunol, Oslo, Norwayen
dc.identifier.journalClinical and vaccine immunology : CVIen
dc.rights.accessOpen Accessen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T13:40:38Z
html.description.abstractNew vaccines targeting meningococci expressing serogroup B polysaccharide have been developed, with some being licensed in Europe. Coverage depends on the distribution of disease-associated genotypes, which may vary by age. It is well established that a small number of hyperinvasive lineages account for most disease, and these lineages are associated with particular antigens, including vaccine candidates. A collection of 4,048 representative meningococcal disease isolates from 18 European countries, collected over a 3-year period, were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Age data were available for 3,147 isolates. The proportions of hyperinvasive lineages, identified as particular clonal complexes (ccs) by MLST, differed among age groups. Subjects <1 year of age experienced lower risk of sequence type 11 (ST-11) cc, ST-32 cc, and ST-269 cc disease and higher risk of disease due to unassigned STs, 1- to 4-year-olds experienced lower risk of ST-11 cc and ST-32 cc disease, 5- to 14-year-olds were less likely to experience ST-11 cc and ST-269 cc disease, and ≥25-year-olds were more likely to experience disease due to less common ccs and unassigned STs. Younger and older subjects were vulnerable to a more diverse set of genotypes, indicating the more clonal nature of genotypes affecting adolescents and young adults. Knowledge of temporal and spatial diversity and the dynamics of meningococcal populations is essential for disease control by vaccines, as coverage is lineage specific. The nonrandom age distribution of hyperinvasive lineages has consequences for the design and implementation of vaccines, as different variants, or perhaps targets, may be required for different age groups.


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