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dc.contributor.authorEinarsdóttir, H
dc.contributor.authorSkoog, L
dc.contributor.authorSöderlund, V
dc.contributor.authorBauer, H C F
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-03T13:40:20Z
dc.date.available2006-07-03T13:40:20Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationActa Radiol 2004, 45(8):840-6en
dc.identifier.issn0284-1851
dc.identifier.pmid15690614
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/3270
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link feilden
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To assess the value of fine-needle aspiration cytology in the diagnostic work-up of lipomatous tumors of the extremities and trunk, and to identify specific radiological features that could aid in the preoperative evaluation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 175 patients with subfascial lipomatous tumors who had undergone preoperative magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography and fine-needle aspiration cytology were studied. The percentage of fat within the lesion was visually graded from the images as: none, 1-75%, 75-95%, or 95-100%. The histological and cytological diagnoses were compared and in discordant cases the radiological images were re-reviewed. RESULTS: There was cytological and histological concordance in 96% of lipomas and in 85% of atypical lipomatous tumors (ALT) and liposarcomas. Most discordant cases exhibited 1-75% fat. Radiological review suggested that cytological sampling problems due to tumor heterogeneity were the main cause of diagnostic difficulties. The majority of tumors with less than 75% fat were liposarcomas, and in no liposarcoma was the fat content higher than 75%. Both ALT and lipoma were found in the 95-100% group. CONCLUSION: Cytology can be highly accurate in the diagnosis of lipomatous tumors, including ALT; however, critical comparison with the radiological findings increases diagnostic security. In tumors with fat content visually assessed as less than 75% of the tumor volume, liposarcoma is the most likely diagnosis and a cytological diagnosis of ALT or lipoma should be questioned. In lesions with 75-95% fat, liposarcoma is unlikely, but FNAC is still indicated for safety. In lesions with 95-100% fat, FNAC is only indicated if the differentiation between lipoma and ALT influences the treatment strategy.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Health Sciencesen
dc.relation.urlhttp://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/content/ppxukbd72feg5n0w/en
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAged, 80 and overen
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectChild, Preschoolen
dc.subjectComparative Studyen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectLipomaen
dc.subjectLiposarcomaen
dc.subjectMagnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectReproducibility of Resultsen
dc.subjectTomography, X-Ray Computeden
dc.subjectRadiologyen
dc.titleAccuracy of cytology for diagnosis of lipomatous tumors: comparison with magnetic resonance and computed tomography findings in 175 casesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalActa radiologica (Stockholm, Sweden : 1987)en
dc.format.digYES
html.description.abstractPURPOSE: To assess the value of fine-needle aspiration cytology in the diagnostic work-up of lipomatous tumors of the extremities and trunk, and to identify specific radiological features that could aid in the preoperative evaluation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 175 patients with subfascial lipomatous tumors who had undergone preoperative magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography and fine-needle aspiration cytology were studied. The percentage of fat within the lesion was visually graded from the images as: none, 1-75%, 75-95%, or 95-100%. The histological and cytological diagnoses were compared and in discordant cases the radiological images were re-reviewed. RESULTS: There was cytological and histological concordance in 96% of lipomas and in 85% of atypical lipomatous tumors (ALT) and liposarcomas. Most discordant cases exhibited 1-75% fat. Radiological review suggested that cytological sampling problems due to tumor heterogeneity were the main cause of diagnostic difficulties. The majority of tumors with less than 75% fat were liposarcomas, and in no liposarcoma was the fat content higher than 75%. Both ALT and lipoma were found in the 95-100% group. CONCLUSION: Cytology can be highly accurate in the diagnosis of lipomatous tumors, including ALT; however, critical comparison with the radiological findings increases diagnostic security. In tumors with fat content visually assessed as less than 75% of the tumor volume, liposarcoma is the most likely diagnosis and a cytological diagnosis of ALT or lipoma should be questioned. In lesions with 75-95% fat, liposarcoma is unlikely, but FNAC is still indicated for safety. In lesions with 95-100% fat, FNAC is only indicated if the differentiation between lipoma and ALT influences the treatment strategy.


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