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dc.contributor.authorYe, Lichuan
dc.contributor.authorPien, Grace W
dc.contributor.authorRatcliffe, Sarah J
dc.contributor.authorBjörnsdottir, Erla
dc.contributor.authorArnardottir, Erna Sif
dc.contributor.authorPack, Allan I
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsdottir, Bryndis
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinn
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-06T16:41:00Z
dc.date.available2015-01-06T16:41:00Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.date.submitted2015
dc.identifier.citationEur. Respir. J. 2014, 44 (6):1600-7en
dc.identifier.issn1399-3003
dc.identifier.pmid25186268
dc.identifier.doi10.1183/09031936.00032314
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/337892
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractAlthough commonly observed in clinical practice, the heterogeneity of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) clinical presentation has not been formally characterised. This study was the first to apply cluster analysis to identify subtypes of patients with OSA who experience distinct combinations of symptoms and comorbidities. An analysis of baseline data from the Icelandic Sleep Apnoea Cohort (822 patients with newly diagnosed moderate-to-severe OSA) was performed. Three distinct clusters were identified. They were classified as the "disturbed sleep group" (cluster 1), "minimally symptomatic group" (cluster 2) and "excessive daytime sleepiness group" (cluster 3), consisting of 32.7%, 24.7% and 42.6% of the entire cohort, respectively. The probabilities of having comorbid hypertension and cardiovascular disease were highest in cluster 2 but lowest in cluster 3. The clusters did not differ significantly in terms of sex, body mass index or apnoea-hypopnoea index. Patients with OSA have different patterns of clinical presentation, which need to be communicated to both the lay public and the professional community with the goal of facilitating care-seeking and early identification of OSA. Identifying distinct clinical profiles of OSA creates a foundation for offering more personalised therapies in the future.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe European Respiratory Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://erj.ersjournals.com/content/44/6/1600.full.pdfen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1183/09031936.00032314en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The European respiratory journalen
dc.subjectKæfisvefnen
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructiveen
dc.titleThe different clinical faces of obstructive sleep apnoea: a cluster analysis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmenta Boston College, William F. Connell School of Nursing, Cushing Hall 423, 140 Commonwealth AvenueChestnut Hill, MA, United States b Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimore, MD, United States c Dept of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of MedicinePhiladelphia, PA, United States d Dept of Respiratory Medicine and Sleep, Landspitali, National University Hospital of IcelandReykjavik, Iceland e Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of IcelandReykjavik, Iceland f Division of Sleep Medicine, Dept of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of MedicinePhiladelphia, PA, United Statesen
dc.identifier.journalThe European respiratory journalen
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
html.description.abstractAlthough commonly observed in clinical practice, the heterogeneity of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) clinical presentation has not been formally characterised. This study was the first to apply cluster analysis to identify subtypes of patients with OSA who experience distinct combinations of symptoms and comorbidities. An analysis of baseline data from the Icelandic Sleep Apnoea Cohort (822 patients with newly diagnosed moderate-to-severe OSA) was performed. Three distinct clusters were identified. They were classified as the "disturbed sleep group" (cluster 1), "minimally symptomatic group" (cluster 2) and "excessive daytime sleepiness group" (cluster 3), consisting of 32.7%, 24.7% and 42.6% of the entire cohort, respectively. The probabilities of having comorbid hypertension and cardiovascular disease were highest in cluster 2 but lowest in cluster 3. The clusters did not differ significantly in terms of sex, body mass index or apnoea-hypopnoea index. Patients with OSA have different patterns of clinical presentation, which need to be communicated to both the lay public and the professional community with the goal of facilitating care-seeking and early identification of OSA. Identifying distinct clinical profiles of OSA creates a foundation for offering more personalised therapies in the future.


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