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dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Hannes
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Mitesh
dc.contributor.authorIngason, Einar F
dc.contributor.authorEinarsson, Einar J
dc.contributor.authorHaraldsson, Ásgeir
dc.contributor.authorFransson, Per-Anders
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-13T13:16:34Z
dc.date.available2015-01-13T13:16:34Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.submitted2015
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE 2014, 9 (11):e112016en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.pmid25405756
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0112016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/338191
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access.en
dc.description.abstractBacterial meningitis in childhood is associated with cognitive deficiencies, sensorimotor impairments and motor dysfunction later in life. However, the long-term effects on postural control is largely unknown, e.g., whether meningitis subjects as adults fully can utilize visual information and adaptation to enhance stability. Thirty-six subjects (20 women, mean age 19.3 years) treated in childhood or adolescence for bacterial meningitis, and 25 controls (13 women, mean age 25.1 years) performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing. The meningitis subjects were screened for subjective vertigo symptoms using a questionnaire, clinically tested with headshake and head thrust test, as well as their hearing was evaluated. Meningitis subjects were significantly more unstable than controls during unperturbed (p≤0.014) and perturbed standing, though while perturbed only with eyes open in anteroposterior direction (p = 0.034) whereas in lateral direction both with eyes open and closed (p<0.001). Meningitis subjects had poorer adaption ability to balance perturbations especially with eyes open, and they frequently reported symptoms of unsteadiness (88% of the subjects) and dizziness (81%), which was found significantly correlated to objectively decreased stability. Out of the 36 subjects only 3 had unilateral hearing impairment. Hence, survivors of childhood bacterial meningitis may suffer long-term disorders affecting postural control, and would greatly benefit if these common late effects became generally known so treatments can be developed and applied.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPLoSen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0112016en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4236047/en
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.subjectHeilahimnubólgaen
dc.subjectBörnen
dc.subjectSjónskerðingen
dc.subjectHreyfifærnien
dc.subjectHeyrnarskerðingen
dc.subjectSvimien
dc.subject.meshMeningitis, Bacterialen
dc.titleLong-term effects from bacterial meningitis in childhood and adolescence on postural control.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Neuro-Otology Department, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland, Children's Hospital Iceland, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.en
dc.identifier.journalPloS oneen
dc.rights.accessOpen Accessen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T14:00:04Z
html.description.abstractBacterial meningitis in childhood is associated with cognitive deficiencies, sensorimotor impairments and motor dysfunction later in life. However, the long-term effects on postural control is largely unknown, e.g., whether meningitis subjects as adults fully can utilize visual information and adaptation to enhance stability. Thirty-six subjects (20 women, mean age 19.3 years) treated in childhood or adolescence for bacterial meningitis, and 25 controls (13 women, mean age 25.1 years) performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing. The meningitis subjects were screened for subjective vertigo symptoms using a questionnaire, clinically tested with headshake and head thrust test, as well as their hearing was evaluated. Meningitis subjects were significantly more unstable than controls during unperturbed (p≤0.014) and perturbed standing, though while perturbed only with eyes open in anteroposterior direction (p = 0.034) whereas in lateral direction both with eyes open and closed (p<0.001). Meningitis subjects had poorer adaption ability to balance perturbations especially with eyes open, and they frequently reported symptoms of unsteadiness (88% of the subjects) and dizziness (81%), which was found significantly correlated to objectively decreased stability. Out of the 36 subjects only 3 had unilateral hearing impairment. Hence, survivors of childhood bacterial meningitis may suffer long-term disorders affecting postural control, and would greatly benefit if these common late effects became generally known so treatments can be developed and applied.


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