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dc.contributor.authorDavis, Benjamin J K
dc.contributor.authorVidal, Jean-Sebastian
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorvan Buchem, Mark A
dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Maria K
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Sigurdur
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Tamara B
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.contributor.authorLauner, Lenore J
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-21T16:19:28Z
dc.date.available2015-01-21T16:19:28Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.date.submitted2015
dc.identifier.citationJ. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 2014, 69 (12):1528-35en
dc.identifier.issn1758-535X
dc.identifier.pmid24994845
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/gerona/glu092
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/338645
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractStudies of older persons show consumption of light-to-moderate amounts of alcohol is positively associated with cognitive function and, separately, is negatively associated with total brain volume (TBV). This is paradoxical as generally, cognitive function is positively associated with TBV. We examined the relationships of TBV, global cognitive function (GCF), and alcohol consumption in a population-based cohort of 3,363 men and women (b. 1907-1935) participating in the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (2002-2006) and who were free of dementia or mild cognitive impairment
dc.description.abstractDrinking status (never, former, and current) and current amount of alcohol consumed were assessed by questionnaire. GCF is a composite score derived from a battery of cognitive tests. TBV, standardized to head size, is estimated quantitatively from brain magnetic resonance imaging.
dc.description.abstractAmong women and not men, adjusting for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, current drinkers had significantly higher GCF scores than abstainers and former drinkers (p < .0001); and GCF was associated with amount consumed. TBV was not associated with drinking status or amount consumed in men or women. GCF and TBV did significantly differ in their associations across alcohol categories (p interaction < .001). Within categories of alcohol intake, GCF and TBV were positively associated.
dc.description.abstractThe difference in associations of alcohol intake to brain structure and function suggests there may be unmeasured factors that contribute to maintaining better GCF relative to TBV. However, at higher levels of reasonable alcohol consumption, there may be factors leading to reduced brain volume.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGerontological Society of Americaen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glu092en
dc.relation.urlhttp://biomedgerontology.oxfordjournals.org/content/69/12/1528.full.pdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciencesen
dc.subjectÁfengisneyslaen
dc.subjectAldraðiren
dc.subjectHeilinnen
dc.subjectElliglöpen
dc.subjectTíðnien
dc.subjectAukaverkaniren
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAgingen
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinkingen
dc.subject.meshBrainen
dc.subject.meshCognition Disordersen
dc.subject.meshDisease Progressionen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Testsen
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleThe alcohol paradox: light-to-moderate alcohol consumption, cognitive function, and brain volume.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. 2Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland. Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik. 3Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands. 4Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland. Faculty of Psychology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik. Geriatric Research Centre in Landsptiali, The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik. 5Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland. 6Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik. Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik. 7Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Marylanden
dc.identifier.journalThe journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciencesen
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
html.description.abstractStudies of older persons show consumption of light-to-moderate amounts of alcohol is positively associated with cognitive function and, separately, is negatively associated with total brain volume (TBV). This is paradoxical as generally, cognitive function is positively associated with TBV. We examined the relationships of TBV, global cognitive function (GCF), and alcohol consumption in a population-based cohort of 3,363 men and women (b. 1907-1935) participating in the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (2002-2006) and who were free of dementia or mild cognitive impairment
html.description.abstractDrinking status (never, former, and current) and current amount of alcohol consumed were assessed by questionnaire. GCF is a composite score derived from a battery of cognitive tests. TBV, standardized to head size, is estimated quantitatively from brain magnetic resonance imaging.
html.description.abstractAmong women and not men, adjusting for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, current drinkers had significantly higher GCF scores than abstainers and former drinkers (p < .0001); and GCF was associated with amount consumed. TBV was not associated with drinking status or amount consumed in men or women. GCF and TBV did significantly differ in their associations across alcohol categories (p interaction < .001). Within categories of alcohol intake, GCF and TBV were positively associated.
html.description.abstractThe difference in associations of alcohol intake to brain structure and function suggests there may be unmeasured factors that contribute to maintaining better GCF relative to TBV. However, at higher levels of reasonable alcohol consumption, there may be factors leading to reduced brain volume.


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