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dc.contributor.authorHelgi Birgisson
dc.contributor.authorPáll Helgi Möller
dc.contributor.authorSigurbjörn Birgisson
dc.contributor.authorÁsgeir Thoroddsen
dc.contributor.authorKristján Skúli Ásgeirsson
dc.contributor.authorSigurður V Sigurjónsson
dc.contributor.authorJónas Magnússon
dc.date.accessioned2006-08-08T16:06:31Z
dc.date.available2006-08-08T16:06:31Z
dc.date.issued2004-03-01
dc.identifier.citationLæknablaðið 2004, 90(3):211-215en
dc.identifier.issn0023-7213
dc.identifier.pmid16819021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/3782
dc.descriptionNeðst á síðunni er hægt að nálgast greinina í heild sinni með því að smella á hlekkinn View/Openis
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate the aetiology, severity and mortality of patients with acute pancreatitis at Landspítali - University Hospital (LSH) and to estimate the incidence in Iceland. Material and methods: A prospective study of all patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis LSH during the one-year period October 1998 - September 1999 inclusive. The main outcome measures were APACHE II, Ranson, and Imrie scores, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. The Balthazar - Ranson criteria were used for scoring of computed tomograms (CT). Results: Twenty seven of the 50 patients were male. The median age of the whole series was 60 years (range 19-85). The estimated incidence was 32/100000 for the first attack of acute pancreatitis. The causes were; gallstones 42%, alcohol 32%, miscellaneous 24%, and idiopathic 2%. Thirty three percentage of the patients had APACHE II scores 9, 38% had Ranson scores of 3, 50% had Imrie scores of 3, and 34% had CRP concentrations >210 mg/L during the first 4 days or >120 mg/L during the first week. Seven patients had severe pancreatitis. Two patients in the whole group died, and both had clinically severe pancreatitis. Conclusions: Incidence and aetiology of acute pancreatitis in Iceland is in concordance to that described in other studies. Prospective assessment makes it possible to evaluate the aetiological factors more accurately. Measurement of the CRP concentration is an attractive and simple alternative to the severity scoring systems currently in use.
dc.languageICEen
dc.language.isoisen
dc.publisherLæknafélag Íslands, Læknafélag Reykjavíkuren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.laeknabladid.is/2004/3/fraedigreinar//nr/1539/en
dc.subjectBriskirtilsbólgaen
dc.subjectBrisen
dc.subject.classificationLBL12en
dc.subject.classificationFræðigreinaren
dc.subject.meshAcute Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshPancreatitisen
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshAPACHEen
dc.titleBráð briskirtilsbólga : framskyggn rannsókn á nýgengi, orsökum, alvarleika og dánartíðni á Íslandien
dc.title.alternativeAcute pancreatitis. Prospective study of incidence, aetiology, severity, and mortality in Icelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalLæknablaðiðis
dc.format.digYES
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T14:17:15Z
html.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate the aetiology, severity and mortality of patients with acute pancreatitis at Landspítali - University Hospital (LSH) and to estimate the incidence in Iceland. Material and methods: A prospective study of all patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis LSH during the one-year period October 1998 - September 1999 inclusive. The main outcome measures were APACHE II, Ranson, and Imrie scores, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. The Balthazar - Ranson criteria were used for scoring of computed tomograms (CT). Results: Twenty seven of the 50 patients were male. The median age of the whole series was 60 years (range 19-85). The estimated incidence was 32/100000 for the first attack of acute pancreatitis. The causes were; gallstones 42%, alcohol 32%, miscellaneous 24%, and idiopathic 2%. Thirty three percentage of the patients had APACHE II scores 9, 38% had Ranson scores of 3, 50% had Imrie scores of 3, and 34% had CRP concentrations >210 mg/L during the first 4 days or >120 mg/L during the first week. Seven patients had severe pancreatitis. Two patients in the whole group died, and both had clinically severe pancreatitis. Conclusions: Incidence and aetiology of acute pancreatitis in Iceland is in concordance to that described in other studies. Prospective assessment makes it possible to evaluate the aetiological factors more accurately. Measurement of the CRP concentration is an attractive and simple alternative to the severity scoring systems currently in use.


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