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dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Helgi*
dc.contributor.authorManolescu, Ileana*
dc.contributor.authorStefansson, Stefan Einar*
dc.contributor.authorIngvarsson, Thorvaldur*
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Hjortur H*
dc.contributor.authorManolescu, Andrei*
dc.contributor.authorGulcher, Jeff*
dc.contributor.authorStefansson, Kari*
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-15T12:21:50Z
dc.date.available2006-09-15T12:21:50Z
dc.date.issued2003-02-01
dc.identifier.citationArthritis Rheum. 2003, 48(2):391-5en
dc.identifier.issn0004-3591
dc.identifier.pmid12571848
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/art.10785
dc.identifier.otherRHE12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/4384
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the contribution of genetics to hand osteoarthritis (HOA) and its subsets in the Icelandic population. METHODS: A list of 2,919 HOA patients, constituting 1% of the Icelandic population, was compiled through nationwide sources. This patient list was cross-referenced with a comprehensive Icelandic genealogy database, enabling the use of algorithms to assess familiality of HOA. Two methods were used: the average pairwise kinship coefficient (KC) of the patients, and the relative risk (RR) of HOA in relatives of patients. In each case, the results were compared with 1,000 control sets of similar composition with regard to number, age, and sex, generated from the genealogy database. RESULTS: The KC for patients was significantly higher than for the control sets and was proportional to the degree of both interphalangeal (IP) and thumb base (first carpometacarpal [CMC] joint) involvement. The RR of HOA in sisters of women in the study was 2.0 (P < 0.001), while the RR in spouses was not significantly different from that in controls. The RR increased with the severity of the disease. Thus, sisters of women with severe IP HOA had an RR of 5.0 and sisters of those with severe first CMC involvement had an RR of 6.9. The increased risk also extended beyond the nuclear family, with significantly increased risk in cousins. CONCLUSION: Patients seeking medical services for HOA are more related to each other than matched controls, supporting the role of a genetic component in the disease. The genetic influence in both IP and first CMC HOA appears to be similar and increases with increasing severity of the disease.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.10785en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshFamilyen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGenealogy and Heraldryen
dc.subject.meshHanden
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshOsteoarthritisen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleThe inheritance of hand osteoarthritis in Icelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Rheumatology, Landspitalinn University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. helgijon@rsp.isen
dc.identifier.journalArthritis and rheumatismen
dc.format.digYES
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the contribution of genetics to hand osteoarthritis (HOA) and its subsets in the Icelandic population. METHODS: A list of 2,919 HOA patients, constituting 1% of the Icelandic population, was compiled through nationwide sources. This patient list was cross-referenced with a comprehensive Icelandic genealogy database, enabling the use of algorithms to assess familiality of HOA. Two methods were used: the average pairwise kinship coefficient (KC) of the patients, and the relative risk (RR) of HOA in relatives of patients. In each case, the results were compared with 1,000 control sets of similar composition with regard to number, age, and sex, generated from the genealogy database. RESULTS: The KC for patients was significantly higher than for the control sets and was proportional to the degree of both interphalangeal (IP) and thumb base (first carpometacarpal [CMC] joint) involvement. The RR of HOA in sisters of women in the study was 2.0 (P < 0.001), while the RR in spouses was not significantly different from that in controls. The RR increased with the severity of the disease. Thus, sisters of women with severe IP HOA had an RR of 5.0 and sisters of those with severe first CMC involvement had an RR of 6.9. The increased risk also extended beyond the nuclear family, with significantly increased risk in cousins. CONCLUSION: Patients seeking medical services for HOA are more related to each other than matched controls, supporting the role of a genetic component in the disease. The genetic influence in both IP and first CMC HOA appears to be similar and increases with increasing severity of the disease.


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