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dc.contributor.authorZeeb, Hajo
dc.contributor.authorBlettner, Maria
dc.contributor.authorLangner, Ingo
dc.contributor.authorHammer, Gaël P
dc.contributor.authorBallard, Terri J
dc.contributor.authorSantaquilani, Mariano
dc.contributor.authorGundestrup, Maryanne
dc.contributor.authorStorm, Hans
dc.contributor.authorHaldorsen, Tor
dc.contributor.authorTveten, Ulf
dc.contributor.authorHammar, Niklas
dc.contributor.authorLinnersjö, Annette
dc.contributor.authorVelonakis, Emmanouel
dc.contributor.authorTzonou, Anastasia
dc.contributor.authorAuvinen, Anssi
dc.contributor.authorPukkala, Eero
dc.contributor.authorRafnsson, Vilhjalmur
dc.contributor.authorHrafnkelsson, Jón
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-25T13:06:42Z
dc.date.available2006-09-25T13:06:42Z
dc.date.issued2003-07-01
dc.identifier.citationAm. J. Epidemiol. 2003, 158(1):35-46en
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262
dc.identifier.pmid12835285
dc.identifier.otherMAO12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/4597
dc.description.abstractThere is concern about the health effects of exposure to cosmic radiation during air travel. To study the potential health effects of this and occupational exposures, the authors investigated mortality patterns among more than 44,000 airline cabin crew members in Europe. A cohort study was performed in eight European countries, yielding approximately 655,000 person-years of follow-up. Observed numbers of deaths were compared with expected numbers based on national mortality rates. Among female cabin crew, overall mortality (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73, 0.88) and all-cancer mortality (SMR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.95) were slightly reduced, while breast cancer mortality was slightly but nonsignificantly increased (SMR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.82, 1.48). In contrast, overall mortality (SMR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.18) and mortality from skin cancer (for malignant melanoma, SMR = 1.93, 95% CI: 0.70, 4.44) among male cabin crew were somewhat increased. The authors noted excess mortality from aircraft accidents and from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in males. Among airline cabin crew in Europe, there was no increase in mortality that could be attributed to cosmic radiation or other occupational exposures to any substantial extent. The risk of skin cancer among male crew members requires further attention.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://aje.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/158/1/35en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAircraften
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshCosmic Radiation/en
dc.subject.meshEurope/epidemiologyen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMortalityen
dc.subject.meshNeoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshOccupational Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshOccupational Exposureen
dc.subject.meshResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.titleMortality from cancer and other causes among airline cabin attendants in Europe: a collaborative cohort study in eight countriesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES
html.description.abstractThere is concern about the health effects of exposure to cosmic radiation during air travel. To study the potential health effects of this and occupational exposures, the authors investigated mortality patterns among more than 44,000 airline cabin crew members in Europe. A cohort study was performed in eight European countries, yielding approximately 655,000 person-years of follow-up. Observed numbers of deaths were compared with expected numbers based on national mortality rates. Among female cabin crew, overall mortality (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73, 0.88) and all-cancer mortality (SMR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.95) were slightly reduced, while breast cancer mortality was slightly but nonsignificantly increased (SMR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.82, 1.48). In contrast, overall mortality (SMR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.18) and mortality from skin cancer (for malignant melanoma, SMR = 1.93, 95% CI: 0.70, 4.44) among male cabin crew were somewhat increased. The authors noted excess mortality from aircraft accidents and from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in males. Among airline cabin crew in Europe, there was no increase in mortality that could be attributed to cosmic radiation or other occupational exposures to any substantial extent. The risk of skin cancer among male crew members requires further attention.


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