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dc.contributor.authorTomasson, K
dc.contributor.authorVaglum, P
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-20T10:09:23Z
dc.date.available2009-01-20T10:09:23Z
dc.date.issued1998-03-01
dc.date.submitted2009-02-20
dc.identifier.citationAddiction 1998, 93(3):423-31en
dc.identifier.issn0965-2140
dc.identifier.pmid10328049
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1360-0443.1998.93342310.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/47755
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractAIMS: To study prospectively the type and extent of aftercare sought by patients following their admission for alcohol and other substance abuse treatment as a function of psychiatric co-morbidity. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with follow-up after 16 months. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A nationwide sample of alcoholics discharged from inpatient treatment (N = 351) in Iceland. MEASUREMENTS: The Diagnostic Interview Schedule was used to assign psychiatric diagnoses at the time of index admission. A questionnaire on the type and number of aftercare attendances was mailed to all participants to obtain information about aftercare. FINDINGS: A combination of attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and professional care was the most common aftercare (49%); while only 8% received no aftercare whatsoever. The mean number of AA attendances was over 24 while it was less than 3 for the various professional appointments. Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia had a lower rate of attendance at AA. Other types of co-morbidity did not affect AA attendance but did increase rates of professional help-seeking. CONCLUSIONS: Better professional treatment attendance might be gained by integrating AA concepts while AA might benefit from professional input to address the prevalent co-morbid psychiatric disorders.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishersen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1360-0443.1998.93342310.xen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAftercareen
dc.subject.meshAlcoholics Anonymousen
dc.subject.meshAlcoholismen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMental Disordersen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNorwayen
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance of Health Careen
dc.subject.meshPatient Complianceen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen
dc.titlePsychiatric co-morbidity and aftercare among alcoholics: a prospective study of a nationwide representative sampleen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, National University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalAddiction (Abingdon, England)en
html.description.abstractAIMS: To study prospectively the type and extent of aftercare sought by patients following their admission for alcohol and other substance abuse treatment as a function of psychiatric co-morbidity. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with follow-up after 16 months. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A nationwide sample of alcoholics discharged from inpatient treatment (N = 351) in Iceland. MEASUREMENTS: The Diagnostic Interview Schedule was used to assign psychiatric diagnoses at the time of index admission. A questionnaire on the type and number of aftercare attendances was mailed to all participants to obtain information about aftercare. FINDINGS: A combination of attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and professional care was the most common aftercare (49%); while only 8% received no aftercare whatsoever. The mean number of AA attendances was over 24 while it was less than 3 for the various professional appointments. Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia had a lower rate of attendance at AA. Other types of co-morbidity did not affect AA attendance but did increase rates of professional help-seeking. CONCLUSIONS: Better professional treatment attendance might be gained by integrating AA concepts while AA might benefit from professional input to address the prevalent co-morbid psychiatric disorders.


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