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dc.contributor.authorJonsson, P V
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-16T10:50:48Z
dc.date.available2009-02-16T10:50:48Z
dc.date.issued1998-06-01
dc.date.submitted2009-02-16
dc.identifier.citationAnn. Intern. Med. 1998, 128(11):941-5en
dc.identifier.issn0003-4819
dc.identifier.pmid9634434
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/49156
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractMedical care in Iceland can be viewed as an experiment of nature. This small island society has combined the Nordic social and welfare structures with advanced international medicine. The Vikings settled Iceland in the ninth century, and the population has remained biologically homogeneous because of its remote isolation. This homogeneity may provide a unique opportunity to contribute to the understanding of the genetics of common disorders. Iceland's isolation has also limited the resources that are available for clinical training. Therefore, it has been necessary for most physicians who graduate from the medical school at the University of Iceland to obtain postgraduate training abroad. This has been of enormous benefit to Icelandic medicine. Fewer opportunities for foreign medical graduates to train in the United States would have a substantial effect on the future practice of Icelandic medicine. The Icelandic health care system faces many challenges. Because health care spending has been reined in, priorities must be set more clearly than in the past, and heated discussions have erupted about gatekeeping and merging of hospitals. These have been "interesting times" for Icelandic medicine. Other countries may learn lessons from our medical situation: a microcosm, to be sure, but no longer an isolated one.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican College of Physicians - American Society of Internal Medicineen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.annals.org/cgi/content/abstract/128/11/941en
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medicalen
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Costsen
dc.subject.meshHealth Services for the Ageden
dc.subject.meshHistory, 15th Centuryen
dc.subject.meshHistory, 16th Centuryen
dc.subject.meshHistory, 17th Centuryen
dc.subject.meshHistory, 18th Centuryen
dc.subject.meshHistory, 19th Centuryen
dc.subject.meshHistory, Ancienten
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshNational Health Programsen
dc.subject.meshPhysiciansen
dc.titleLetter from Reykjaviken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentReykjavik Hospital, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of internal medicineen
html.description.abstractMedical care in Iceland can be viewed as an experiment of nature. This small island society has combined the Nordic social and welfare structures with advanced international medicine. The Vikings settled Iceland in the ninth century, and the population has remained biologically homogeneous because of its remote isolation. This homogeneity may provide a unique opportunity to contribute to the understanding of the genetics of common disorders. Iceland's isolation has also limited the resources that are available for clinical training. Therefore, it has been necessary for most physicians who graduate from the medical school at the University of Iceland to obtain postgraduate training abroad. This has been of enormous benefit to Icelandic medicine. Fewer opportunities for foreign medical graduates to train in the United States would have a substantial effect on the future practice of Icelandic medicine. The Icelandic health care system faces many challenges. Because health care spending has been reined in, priorities must be set more clearly than in the past, and heated discussions have erupted about gatekeeping and merging of hospitals. These have been "interesting times" for Icelandic medicine. Other countries may learn lessons from our medical situation: a microcosm, to be sure, but no longer an isolated one.


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