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dc.contributor.authorPatel, Mitesh
dc.contributor.authorMagnusson, Mans
dc.contributor.authorKristinsdottir, Ella
dc.contributor.authorFransson, Per-Anders
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-12T09:37:35Z
dc.date.available2009-03-12T09:37:35Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-01
dc.date.submitted2009-03-12
dc.identifier.citationEur. J. Appl. Physiol. 2009, 105(2):167-73en
dc.identifier.issn1439-6327
dc.identifier.pmid18925415
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00421-008-0886-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/54473
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe aim was to determine the contributions of foot mechanoreceptive sensation, vision and their interaction on postural stability during quiet stance, balance perturbations and adaptive adjustments. Postural stability was measured as anteroposterior torque variance in Young (n = 25, average age = 25.1 years) and Elderly subjects (n = 16, average age = 71.5 years) during repeated calf vibrations while standing with eyes open and closed. Sensation, recorded using vibration perception and tactile sensitivity, was poorer in elderly than young subjects. Sensation was of low importance for stability during quiet stance and the first 50 s of repeated vibrations, but was associated with stability during the last three 50 s periods of balance perturbations, suggesting that the mechanoreceptive sensation affected how well postural control could adapt to repeated balance perturbations. The findings suggest that clinicians should investigate whether patients with balance problems and poor adaptation have mechanoreceptive sensation deficits.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/e65543522m5612p4en
dc.subject.meshPubMed - in processen
dc.titleThe contribution of mechanoreceptive sensation on stability and adaptation in the young and elderlyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, 221 85 Lund, Sweden.en
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of applied physiologyen
html.description.abstractThe aim was to determine the contributions of foot mechanoreceptive sensation, vision and their interaction on postural stability during quiet stance, balance perturbations and adaptive adjustments. Postural stability was measured as anteroposterior torque variance in Young (n = 25, average age = 25.1 years) and Elderly subjects (n = 16, average age = 71.5 years) during repeated calf vibrations while standing with eyes open and closed. Sensation, recorded using vibration perception and tactile sensitivity, was poorer in elderly than young subjects. Sensation was of low importance for stability during quiet stance and the first 50 s of repeated vibrations, but was associated with stability during the last three 50 s periods of balance perturbations, suggesting that the mechanoreceptive sensation affected how well postural control could adapt to repeated balance perturbations. The findings suggest that clinicians should investigate whether patients with balance problems and poor adaptation have mechanoreceptive sensation deficits.


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