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dc.contributor.authorEnglund-Ögge, Linda
dc.contributor.authorBrantsæter, Anne Lise
dc.contributor.authorSengpiel, Verena
dc.contributor.authorHaugen, Margareta
dc.contributor.authorBirgisdottir, Bryndis Eva
dc.contributor.authorMyhre, Ronny
dc.contributor.authorMeltzer, Helle Margrete
dc.contributor.authorJacobsson, Bo
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-29T11:33:49Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-29T11:33:49Zen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationBMJ 2014, 348:g1446en
dc.identifier.issn1756-1833en
dc.identifier.pmid24609054en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/550898en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access.en
dc.description.abstractTo examine whether an association exists between maternal dietary patterns and risk of preterm delivery.
dc.description.abstractProspective cohort study.
dc.description.abstractNorway, between 2002 and 2008.
dc.description.abstract66 000 pregnant women (singletons, answered food frequency questionnaire, no missing information about parity or previously preterm delivery, pregnancy duration between 22+0 and 41+6 gestational weeks, no diabetes, first enrolment pregnancy).
dc.description.abstractHazard ratio for preterm delivery according to level of adherence to three distinct dietary patterns interpreted as "prudent" (for example, vegetables, fruits, oils, water as beverage, whole grain cereals, fibre rich bread), "Western" (salty and sweet snacks, white bread, desserts, processed meat products), and "traditional" (potatoes, fish).
dc.description.abstractAfter adjustment for covariates, high scores on the "prudent" pattern were associated with significantly reduced risk of preterm delivery hazard ratio for the highest versus the lowest third (0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.80 to 0.97). The prudent pattern was also associated with a significantly lower risk of late and spontaneous preterm delivery. No independent association with preterm delivery was found for the "Western" pattern. The "traditional" pattern was associated with reduced risk of preterm delivery for the highest versus the lowest third (hazard ratio 0.91, 0.83 to 0.99).
dc.description.abstractThis study showed that women adhering to a "prudent" or a "traditional" dietary pattern during pregnancy were at lower risk of preterm delivery compared with other women. Although these findings cannot establish causality, they support dietary advice to pregnant women to eat a balanced diet including vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and fish and to drink water. Our results indicate that increasing the intake of foods associated with a prudent dietary pattern is more important than totally excluding processed food, fast food, junk food, and snacks.
dc.description.sponsorshipFreemasons Directorate board for Children Adlerbertska Foundation Hjalmar Svensson Foundation Norwegian Research Council FUGE 183220/S10 FRIMEDKLI-05 ES236011 Jane and Dan Olsson Foundation Swedish Medical Society SLS 2008-21198 Swedish government ALFGBG-2863 ALFGBG-11522 Norwegian Ministry of Health Ministry of Education and Research NIH/NINDS 1 UO1 NS 047537-01 2 UO1 NS 047537-06A1 Norwegian Research Council/FUGE 151918/S10 NIH/NIEHS N01-ES-75558en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1136/bmj.g1446en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3942565/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMJ (Clinical research ed.)en
dc.subjectMeðgangaen
dc.subjectMataræðien
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshDieten
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFood Habitsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshNorwayen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPremature Birthen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleMaternal dietary patterns and preterm delivery: results from large prospective cohort study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, SE-41685 Gothenburg, Sweden, Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Environm Med, Dept Exposure & Risk Assessment, Oslo, Norway, Univ Iceland, Fac Food Sci & Nutr, Natl Univ Hosp, Unit Nutr Res, Reykjavik, Iceland, Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol, Dept Genes & Environm, Oslo, Norwayen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ (Clinical research ed.)en
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T15:05:56Z
html.description.abstractTo examine whether an association exists between maternal dietary patterns and risk of preterm delivery.
html.description.abstractProspective cohort study.
html.description.abstractNorway, between 2002 and 2008.
html.description.abstract66 000 pregnant women (singletons, answered food frequency questionnaire, no missing information about parity or previously preterm delivery, pregnancy duration between 22+0 and 41+6 gestational weeks, no diabetes, first enrolment pregnancy).
html.description.abstractHazard ratio for preterm delivery according to level of adherence to three distinct dietary patterns interpreted as "prudent" (for example, vegetables, fruits, oils, water as beverage, whole grain cereals, fibre rich bread), "Western" (salty and sweet snacks, white bread, desserts, processed meat products), and "traditional" (potatoes, fish).
html.description.abstractAfter adjustment for covariates, high scores on the "prudent" pattern were associated with significantly reduced risk of preterm delivery hazard ratio for the highest versus the lowest third (0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.80 to 0.97). The prudent pattern was also associated with a significantly lower risk of late and spontaneous preterm delivery. No independent association with preterm delivery was found for the "Western" pattern. The "traditional" pattern was associated with reduced risk of preterm delivery for the highest versus the lowest third (hazard ratio 0.91, 0.83 to 0.99).
html.description.abstractThis study showed that women adhering to a "prudent" or a "traditional" dietary pattern during pregnancy were at lower risk of preterm delivery compared with other women. Although these findings cannot establish causality, they support dietary advice to pregnant women to eat a balanced diet including vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and fish and to drink water. Our results indicate that increasing the intake of foods associated with a prudent dietary pattern is more important than totally excluding processed food, fast food, junk food, and snacks.


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