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dc.contributor.authorVidarsdottir, Halldora
dc.contributor.authorFang, Fang
dc.contributor.authorChang, Milan
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorFall, Katja
dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Maria K
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Palmi V
dc.contributor.authorCotch, Mary Frances
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Tamara B
dc.contributor.authorLauner, Lenore J
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsdottir, Unnur
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-13T14:01:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-13T14:01:26Zen
dc.date.issued2014-03-15en
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citation2014, 179 (6):674-83 Am. J. Epidemiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1476-6256en
dc.identifier.pmid24444551en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwt321en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/552697en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access.en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the associations between loss of a life partner and the development of dementia and decline in cognitive function in later life. We used an Icelandic cohort of 4,370 participants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study who were living as married in 1978 (born in 1907-1935) and were either still married (unexposed cohort) or widowed (exposed cohort) at follow-up (in 2002-2006). We ascertained history of marital status and spouse's death by record linkage to the Registry of the Total Population, Statistics Iceland. The outcome measures were as follows: 1) dementia and mild cognitive impairment; and 2) memory, speed of processing, and executive function. During the observation period, 3,007 individuals remained married and 1,363 lost a spouse through death. We did not find any significant associations between loss of a spouse and our outcome variables, except that widowed women had poorer executive function (mean = -0.08) during the first 2 years after their husbands' deaths compared with still-married women (mean = 0.09). Our findings do not support the notion that the risk of dementia is increased following the loss of a spouse, yet women demonstrate a seemingly temporary decline in executive function following the death of a partner.
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Iceland Research Fund for Graduate Students Icelandic Research Fund for Graduate Students (Rannis) Memorial Fund of Helga Jonsdottir and Sigurlidi Kristjansson Research Fund of Oldrunarrad Islands Icelandic Gerontological Society Research Fund Fund of Gudmundur Andresson Swedish Society for Medical Research National Institute on Aging N01-AG-1-2100 National Institute on Aging Icelandic Parliament Icelandic Heart Associationen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford Univ Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1093/aje/kwt321en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3939848/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to American journal of epidemiologyen
dc.subjectElliglöpen
dc.subjectEkkjuren
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshApolipoproteins Een
dc.subject.meshCognitionen
dc.subject.meshDementiaen
dc.subject.meshExecutive Functionen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMemoryen
dc.subject.meshMild Cognitive Impairmenten
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychologicalen
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen
dc.subject.meshWidowhooden
dc.titleSpousal loss and cognitive function in later life: a 25-year follow-up in the AGES-Reykjavik study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAddresses: [Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s)] [ 1 ] Univ Iceland, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland [Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s)] [ 2 ] Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden [Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s)] [ 3 ] Natl Univ Hosp Reykjavik, Geriatr Res Ctr, Reykjavik, Iceland [Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s)] [ 4 ] Reykjavik Univ, Sch Sci & Engn, Dept Sports Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 5 ] Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland [Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s)] [ 6 ] Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, Orebro, Sweden [Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s)] [ 7 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Psychol, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland [Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s)] [ 8 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland [Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s)] [ 9 ] Natl Univ Hosp Reykjavik, Dept Geriatr, Reykjavik, Iceland [Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s)] [ 10 ] NEI, Div Epidemiol & Clin Applicat, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA [Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s)] [ 11 ] NIA, Lab Epidemiol Demog & Biometry, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA [Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s)] [ 12 ] Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USAen
dc.identifier.journalAmerican journal of epidemiologyen
dc.rights.accessOpen Accessen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T15:12:13Z
html.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the associations between loss of a life partner and the development of dementia and decline in cognitive function in later life. We used an Icelandic cohort of 4,370 participants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study who were living as married in 1978 (born in 1907-1935) and were either still married (unexposed cohort) or widowed (exposed cohort) at follow-up (in 2002-2006). We ascertained history of marital status and spouse's death by record linkage to the Registry of the Total Population, Statistics Iceland. The outcome measures were as follows: 1) dementia and mild cognitive impairment; and 2) memory, speed of processing, and executive function. During the observation period, 3,007 individuals remained married and 1,363 lost a spouse through death. We did not find any significant associations between loss of a spouse and our outcome variables, except that widowed women had poorer executive function (mean = -0.08) during the first 2 years after their husbands' deaths compared with still-married women (mean = 0.09). Our findings do not support the notion that the risk of dementia is increased following the loss of a spouse, yet women demonstrate a seemingly temporary decline in executive function following the death of a partner.


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