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dc.contributor.authorVolpe, Gretchen E
dc.contributor.authorWanke, Christine A
dc.contributor.authorImai, Cindy M
dc.contributor.authorHeffernan, Kevin S
dc.contributor.authorKuvin, Jeffrey T
dc.contributor.authorMangili, Alexandra
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-13T14:13:27Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-13T14:13:27Zen
dc.date.issued2014-09en
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationAIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 2014, 30 (9):881-7en
dc.identifier.issn1931-8405en
dc.identifier.pmid24892462en
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/AID.2013.0272en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/552706en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractPrior studies have demonstrated impaired endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in healthy subjects following a high-fat meal. Compared to uninfected individuals, HIV-infected persons have been shown to have impaired FMD. We examined the effect of two different high-fat meals on endothelial function in HIV-infected and uninfected men. We performed a randomized, parallel group crossover study comparing 47 white men [18 HIV-uninfected, 9 HIV-infected and antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve, and 20 HIV-infected men on ART]. Fasting participants consumed one of two randomly assigned high-fat meals of either saturated or polyunsaturated fat, followed at least 24 h later by the other meal. Brachial artery ultrasound measurements to assess vascular reactivity were performed before and 3 h after each dietary challenge. There was no significant difference in mean baseline or postprandial FMD between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants (mean baseline FMD±SD, 9.0%±5 vs. 9.2%±5, p=0.9; mean postprandial FMD±SD, 9.0%±4.7 vs. 9.1%±4.7, p=0.96, respectively). No significant difference in baseline or postprandial change in FMD was found between meals or HIV treatment groups. Fasting lipids and glucose, CD4(+) count, and viral load did not predict FMD in HIV-infected participants. In contrast to previous reports, this study did not demonstrate impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation after high-fat meals in either HIV-infected or HIV-uninfected men. Moreover, HIV infection itself may not be the primary explanation for the abnormal endothelial function reported in HIV-infected individuals.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMary Ann Lieberten
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1089/AID.2013.0272en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to AIDS research and human retrovirusesen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDiet, High-Faten
dc.subject.meshEndothelium, Vascularen
dc.subject.meshHIV Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPostprandial Perioden
dc.titleHigh-fat meals do not impair postprandial endothelial function in HIV-infected and uninfected men.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Tufts Medical Center , Boston, Massachusettsen
dc.identifier.journalAIDS research and human retrovirusesen
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
html.description.abstractPrior studies have demonstrated impaired endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in healthy subjects following a high-fat meal. Compared to uninfected individuals, HIV-infected persons have been shown to have impaired FMD. We examined the effect of two different high-fat meals on endothelial function in HIV-infected and uninfected men. We performed a randomized, parallel group crossover study comparing 47 white men [18 HIV-uninfected, 9 HIV-infected and antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve, and 20 HIV-infected men on ART]. Fasting participants consumed one of two randomly assigned high-fat meals of either saturated or polyunsaturated fat, followed at least 24 h later by the other meal. Brachial artery ultrasound measurements to assess vascular reactivity were performed before and 3 h after each dietary challenge. There was no significant difference in mean baseline or postprandial FMD between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants (mean baseline FMD±SD, 9.0%±5 vs. 9.2%±5, p=0.9; mean postprandial FMD±SD, 9.0%±4.7 vs. 9.1%±4.7, p=0.96, respectively). No significant difference in baseline or postprandial change in FMD was found between meals or HIV treatment groups. Fasting lipids and glucose, CD4(+) count, and viral load did not predict FMD in HIV-infected participants. In contrast to previous reports, this study did not demonstrate impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation after high-fat meals in either HIV-infected or HIV-uninfected men. Moreover, HIV infection itself may not be the primary explanation for the abnormal endothelial function reported in HIV-infected individuals.


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