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dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsson, Steinn
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Martin I
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsdottir, Hafdis
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorMagnusson, Andres
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-25T12:04:36Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-25T12:04:36Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02-23en
dc.date.submitted2016en
dc.identifier.citationCrim Behav Ment Health. 2016 Feb;26(1):6-17en
dc.identifier.issn1471-2857en
dc.identifier.pmid25703597en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/cbm.1944en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/558516en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractThere is a strong correlation between severe mental illness and criminality, but little is known about how these two problem areas together may affect health outcomes.
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this paper is to compare survival rates of male psychiatric inpatients over a 25-year period who have and have not been subject to imprisonment, allowing for nature of psychiatric morbidity.
dc.description.abstractA nationwide cohort of men who had ever been psychiatric inpatients was identified from Icelandic data-registers, and their diagnoses after first discharge, cumulative incidence of imprisonment, and mortality established from records. Using a nested case-control design, survival differences were determined between those ever imprisoned and those never imprisoned.
dc.description.abstractBetween January 1983 and March 2008, 7665 men were admitted to psychiatric wards in Iceland, of whom 812 (10.6%) had served a prison sentence during that time. Cumulative incidence of imprisonment was highest in the youngest age group (21%). Substance use and personality disorders were more common amongst those imprisoned. All-cause mortality, adjusted for diagnosis, age, and year of admission, was twice as high amongst those imprisoned as those not imprisoned (Hazard ratio = 2.0, 95% CI 1.5-2.6, p < 0.001).
dc.description.abstractOur findings indicate that psychiatric inpatients with criminal records should receive special attention with respect to all aspects of their health, not only within psychiatric services but also through more collaboration between the healthcare and judicial systems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
dc.languageENGen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWhurr Publishers Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1002/cbm.1944en
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cbm.1944/epdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Criminal behaviour and mental health : CBMHen
dc.subjectGeðsjúkdómaren
dc.subjectLífslíkuren
dc.subject.meshMental Disordersen
dc.subject.meshLife Expectancyen
dc.titleMental disorder, imprisonment and reduced life expectancy - A nationwide psychiatric inpatient cohort study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1Mental Health Services, Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health (CELAM), Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, The University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.en
dc.identifier.journalCriminal behaviour and mental health : CBMHen
dc.rights.accessClosed - Lokaðen
html.description.abstractThere is a strong correlation between severe mental illness and criminality, but little is known about how these two problem areas together may affect health outcomes.
html.description.abstractThe objective of this paper is to compare survival rates of male psychiatric inpatients over a 25-year period who have and have not been subject to imprisonment, allowing for nature of psychiatric morbidity.
html.description.abstractA nationwide cohort of men who had ever been psychiatric inpatients was identified from Icelandic data-registers, and their diagnoses after first discharge, cumulative incidence of imprisonment, and mortality established from records. Using a nested case-control design, survival differences were determined between those ever imprisoned and those never imprisoned.
html.description.abstractBetween January 1983 and March 2008, 7665 men were admitted to psychiatric wards in Iceland, of whom 812 (10.6%) had served a prison sentence during that time. Cumulative incidence of imprisonment was highest in the youngest age group (21%). Substance use and personality disorders were more common amongst those imprisoned. All-cause mortality, adjusted for diagnosis, age, and year of admission, was twice as high amongst those imprisoned as those not imprisoned (Hazard ratio = 2.0, 95% CI 1.5-2.6, p < 0.001).
html.description.abstractOur findings indicate that psychiatric inpatients with criminal records should receive special attention with respect to all aspects of their health, not only within psychiatric services but also through more collaboration between the healthcare and judicial systems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


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