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dc.contributor.authorSigurdardottir, Anna Olafia
dc.contributor.authorSvavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun
dc.contributor.authorJuliusdottir, Sigrun
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T15:25:03Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-21T15:25:03Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07en
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationNurse Educ Today 2015, 35 (7):854-8en
dc.identifier.issn1532-2793en
dc.identifier.pmid25825355en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nedt.2015.03.003en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/560798en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a family systems nursing hospital training educational program (ETI program) on nurses' and midwives' perception of job demands, control, and/or support. Of the nurses and midwives who were working in the Women's and Children's Services Division at The National University Hospital in Iceland, 479 participated in the study on three time periods from 2009 to 2011. Scores for the characteristics of job demands and job control were created to categorize participants into four job types (Karasek and Theorell, 1990). These four job types are high strain (high demand, low control), passive (low demand, low control), low strain (low demand, high control), and active (high demand, high control). However, when the data were evaluated based on the proportion of job characteristics as reported by the nurses and the midwives, no significant difference was found over time (2009 to 2011) (χ(2)=5.203, p=.518). However, based on the results from the independent t-tests at time 1, a significant difference was found amongst the high strain job group regarding perceived support from administrators and colleagues among the nurses and midwives who had taken the ETI program compared to those who had not taken the program (χ(2)=2.218, p=.034). This indicates that the health care professionals who characterized their job to be of high demand but with low control evaluated the support from their administrators and colleagues to be significantly higher if they had taken the ETI program than did the nurses and midwives who did not take the ETI program. These findings are promising because they might, in the long run, increase the nurses' and midwives' autonomy and control over their own work.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational University Hospital in Iceland Icelandic Nurses' Association Science Fund of Ingibjorg R. Magnusdottiren
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstoneen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1016/j.nedt2015.03.003en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nurse education todayen
dc.subjectHjúkrunarfræðingaren
dc.subjectMenntunen
dc.subjectSjúkrahúsen
dc.subject.meshFamily Nursingen
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten
dc.subject.meshJob Satisfactionen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshProfessional Autonomyen
dc.subject.meshBurnout, Professionalen
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Teachingen
dc.subject.meshNursesen
dc.subject.meshNurse Midwivesen
dc.subject.meshEducationen
dc.titleFamily nursing hospital training and the outcome on job demands, control and support.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Landspitali, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Fac Nursing, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 3 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Social Sci, Dept Social Work, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalNurse education todayen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a family systems nursing hospital training educational program (ETI program) on nurses' and midwives' perception of job demands, control, and/or support. Of the nurses and midwives who were working in the Women's and Children's Services Division at The National University Hospital in Iceland, 479 participated in the study on three time periods from 2009 to 2011. Scores for the characteristics of job demands and job control were created to categorize participants into four job types (Karasek and Theorell, 1990). These four job types are high strain (high demand, low control), passive (low demand, low control), low strain (low demand, high control), and active (high demand, high control). However, when the data were evaluated based on the proportion of job characteristics as reported by the nurses and the midwives, no significant difference was found over time (2009 to 2011) (χ(2)=5.203, p=.518). However, based on the results from the independent t-tests at time 1, a significant difference was found amongst the high strain job group regarding perceived support from administrators and colleagues among the nurses and midwives who had taken the ETI program compared to those who had not taken the program (χ(2)=2.218, p=.034). This indicates that the health care professionals who characterized their job to be of high demand but with low control evaluated the support from their administrators and colleagues to be significantly higher if they had taken the ETI program than did the nurses and midwives who did not take the ETI program. These findings are promising because they might, in the long run, increase the nurses' and midwives' autonomy and control over their own work.


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