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dc.contributor.authorDatema, Mareen R
dc.contributor.authorZuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian
dc.contributor.authorAsero, Riccardo
dc.contributor.authorBarreales, Laura
dc.contributor.authorBelohlavkova, Simona
dc.contributor.authorde Blay, Frédéric
dc.contributor.authorBures, Peter
dc.contributor.authorClausen, Michael
dc.contributor.authorDubakiene, Ruta
dc.contributor.authorGislason, David
dc.contributor.authorJedrzejczak-Czechowicz, Monika
dc.contributor.authorKowalski, Marek L
dc.contributor.authorKnulst, André C
dc.contributor.authorKralimarkova, Tanya
dc.contributor.authorLe, Thuy-My
dc.contributor.authorLovegrove, Alison
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Justin
dc.contributor.authorPapadopoulos, Nikolaos G
dc.contributor.authorPopov, Todor
dc.contributor.authorDel Prado, Náyade
dc.contributor.authorPurohit, Ashok
dc.contributor.authorReese, Gerald
dc.contributor.authorReig, Isabel
dc.contributor.authorSeneviratne, Suranjith L
dc.contributor.authorSinaniotis, Athanasios
dc.contributor.authorVersteeg, Serge A
dc.contributor.authorVieths, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorZwinderman, Aeilko H
dc.contributor.authorMills, Clare
dc.contributor.authorLidholm, Jonas
dc.contributor.authorHoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Rivas, Montserrat
dc.contributor.authorBallmer-Weber, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorvan Ree, Ronald
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-23T10:28:15Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-23T10:28:15Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03-13en
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationJ. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 2015:en
dc.identifier.issn1097-6825en
dc.identifier.pmid25772593en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jaci.2014.12.1949en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/560884en
dc.description.abstractHazelnut allergy is birch pollen-driven in Northern/Western Europe and lipid transfer protein-driven in Spain and Italy. Little is known about other regions and other allergens.
dc.description.abstractEstablishing a molecular map of hazelnut allergy across Europe.
dc.description.abstractIn 12 European cities, subjects reporting reactions to hazelnut (n = 731) were evaluated and sensitization to 24 foods, 12 respiratory allergen sources, and latex was tested by using skin prick test and ImmunoCAP. A subset (124 of 731) underwent a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge to hazelnut. Sera of 423 of 731 subjects were analyzed for IgE against 7 hazelnut allergens and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants by ImmunoCAP.
dc.description.abstractHazelnut allergy was confirmed in 70% of those undergoing double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges. Birch pollen-driven hazelnut sensitization (Cor a 1) dominated in most cities, except in Reykjavik, Sofia, Athens, and Madrid, where reporting of hazelnut allergy was less frequent anyhow. In Athens, IgE against Cor a 8 dominated and strongly correlated with IgE against walnut, peach, and apple and against Chenopodium, plane tree, and mugwort pollen. Sensitization to seed storage proteins was observed in less than 10%, mainly in children, and correlated with IgE to nuts, seeds, and legumes. IgE to Cor a 12, observed in all cities (10% to 25%), correlated with IgE to nuts, seeds, and pollen.
dc.description.abstractIn adulthood, the importance of hazelnut sensitization to storage proteins, oleosin (Cor a 12), and Cor a 8 is diluted by the increased role of birch pollen cross-reactivity with Cor a 1. Cor a 8 sensitization in the Mediterranean is probably driven by diet in combination with pollen exposure. Hazelnut oleosin sensitization is prevalent across Europe; however, the clinical relevance remains to be established.
dc.description.sponsorshipinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/ 312147en
dc.languageENGen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/ 312147en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of allergy and clinical immunologyen
dc.subjectOfnæmien
dc.subjectFæðuofnæmien
dc.subject.meshHypersensitivityen
dc.subject.meshCorylus/adverse effectsen
dc.titleHazelnut allergy across Europe dissected molecularly: A EuroPrevall outpatient clinic survey.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1Department of Experimental Immunology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 2Ambulatorio di Allergologia, Clinica San Carlo, Paderno Dugnano, Italy. 3Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Preventive Medicine Department, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, IdISSC, Madrid, Spain. 4Pediatric Department, Faculty Hospital Bulovka, Prague, Czech Republic. 5Allergy Division, Chest Disease Department, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France. 6Allergy Unit, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. 7Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. 8Medical Faculty, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania. 9Department of Immunology, Rheumatology and Allergy, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. 10Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. 11Clinic of Allergy and Asthma, Medical University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria. 12Department of Plant Biology and Crop Science, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, United Kingdom. 13Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. 14Allergy Department, 2nd Pediatric Clinic, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Centre for Paediatrics and Child Health, Institute of Human Development, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. 15Division of Allergology, Paul-Ehrlich-Insitut, Federal Institute for Vaccines and Biomedicines, Langen, Germany. 16Allergy Department, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, IdISSC, Madrid, Spain. 17Department of Clinical Immunology, St Mary's Hospital, and Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. 18Allergy Department, 2nd Pediatric Clinic, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. 19Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 20Phadia AB, Uppsala, Sweden. 21Department of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. 22Department of Experimental Immunology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdamen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of allergy and clinical immunologyen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractHazelnut allergy is birch pollen-driven in Northern/Western Europe and lipid transfer protein-driven in Spain and Italy. Little is known about other regions and other allergens.
html.description.abstractEstablishing a molecular map of hazelnut allergy across Europe.
html.description.abstractIn 12 European cities, subjects reporting reactions to hazelnut (n = 731) were evaluated and sensitization to 24 foods, 12 respiratory allergen sources, and latex was tested by using skin prick test and ImmunoCAP. A subset (124 of 731) underwent a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge to hazelnut. Sera of 423 of 731 subjects were analyzed for IgE against 7 hazelnut allergens and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants by ImmunoCAP.
html.description.abstractHazelnut allergy was confirmed in 70% of those undergoing double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges. Birch pollen-driven hazelnut sensitization (Cor a 1) dominated in most cities, except in Reykjavik, Sofia, Athens, and Madrid, where reporting of hazelnut allergy was less frequent anyhow. In Athens, IgE against Cor a 8 dominated and strongly correlated with IgE against walnut, peach, and apple and against Chenopodium, plane tree, and mugwort pollen. Sensitization to seed storage proteins was observed in less than 10%, mainly in children, and correlated with IgE to nuts, seeds, and legumes. IgE to Cor a 12, observed in all cities (10% to 25%), correlated with IgE to nuts, seeds, and pollen.
html.description.abstractIn adulthood, the importance of hazelnut sensitization to storage proteins, oleosin (Cor a 12), and Cor a 8 is diluted by the increased role of birch pollen cross-reactivity with Cor a 1. Cor a 8 sensitization in the Mediterranean is probably driven by diet in combination with pollen exposure. Hazelnut oleosin sensitization is prevalent across Europe; however, the clinical relevance remains to be established.


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