Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGunnarsson, Björn
dc.contributor.authorJensen, Niels S Kieler
dc.contributor.authorGarði, Tummas I
dc.contributor.authorHarðardóttir, Helga
dc.contributor.authorStefánsdóttir, Lilja
dc.contributor.authorHeimisdóttir, María
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-29T11:04:25Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-29T11:04:25Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationInt J Circumpolar Health 2015, 74:25697en
dc.identifier.issn2242-3982en
dc.identifier.pmid26066019en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/561199en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access.en
dc.description.abstractThe Nordic Atlantic Cooperation (NORA) is an intergovernmental organization under the auspices of the Nordic Council of Ministers. The NORA region comprises Greenland, Iceland, Faroe Islands and western coastal areas of Norway. Historical, cultural and institutional links bind these nations together in multiple ways, and regional co-operation has in recent years become a focus of interest. This commentary addresses air medical services (AMSs) and available advanced hospital services in the 3 smallest NORA countries challenged sparse populations, hereafter referred to as the region. It seems likely that strengthened regional co-operation can help these countries to address common challenges within health care by exchanging know-how and best practices, pooling resources and improving the efficiency of care delivery. The 4 largest hospitals in the region, Dronning Ingrids Hospital in Nuuk (Greenland), Landspítali in Reykjavík and Sjúkrahúsið á Akureyri, (both in Iceland) and Landssjúkrahúsið Tórshavn on the Faroe Islands, have therefore undertaken the project Network for patient transport in the North-West Atlantic (in Danish: Netværk for patienttransport i Vest-Norden). The goal of the project, and of this article, is to exchange information and provide an overview of current AMSs and access to acute hospital care for severely ill or injured patients in the 3 participating countries. Of equal importance is the intention to highlight the need for increased regional co-operation to optimize use of limited resources in the provision of health care services.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCo-Action Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.3402/ijch.v74.25697en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of circumpolar healthen
dc.subjectSjúkraflutningaren
dc.subjectBráðamóttakaen
dc.subjectSamvinnaen
dc.subject.meshDenmarken
dc.subject.meshGreenlanden
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshnternational Cooperationen
dc.subject.meshAir Ambulancesen
dc.subject.meshEmergency Medical Servicesen
dc.subject.meshDelivery of Health Careen
dc.titleAir ambulance and hospital services for critically ill and injured in Greenland, Iceland and the Faroe Islands: how can we improve?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1Norwegian Air Ambulance Foundation, Drøbak, Norway; bjorn.gunnarsson@norskluftambulanse.no. 2Rigshospitalet, København, Denmark. 3Landssjúkrahúsið, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands. 4Landspítali, Reykjavík, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of circumpolar healthen
dc.rights.accessOpen Accessen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T15:22:03Z
html.description.abstractThe Nordic Atlantic Cooperation (NORA) is an intergovernmental organization under the auspices of the Nordic Council of Ministers. The NORA region comprises Greenland, Iceland, Faroe Islands and western coastal areas of Norway. Historical, cultural and institutional links bind these nations together in multiple ways, and regional co-operation has in recent years become a focus of interest. This commentary addresses air medical services (AMSs) and available advanced hospital services in the 3 smallest NORA countries challenged sparse populations, hereafter referred to as the region. It seems likely that strengthened regional co-operation can help these countries to address common challenges within health care by exchanging know-how and best practices, pooling resources and improving the efficiency of care delivery. The 4 largest hospitals in the region, Dronning Ingrids Hospital in Nuuk (Greenland), Landspítali in Reykjavík and Sjúkrahúsið á Akureyri, (both in Iceland) and Landssjúkrahúsið Tórshavn on the Faroe Islands, have therefore undertaken the project Network for patient transport in the North-West Atlantic (in Danish: Netværk for patienttransport i Vest-Norden). The goal of the project, and of this article, is to exchange information and provide an overview of current AMSs and access to acute hospital care for severely ill or injured patients in the 3 participating countries. Of equal importance is the intention to highlight the need for increased regional co-operation to optimize use of limited resources in the provision of health care services.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
pdf_18.pdf
Size:
477.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record