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dc.contributor.authorZoëga, Sigridur
dc.contributor.authorWard, Sandra E
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Gisli H
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorSveinsdottir, Herdis
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Sigridur
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-10T14:38:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-10T14:38:26Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06en
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationPain Manag Nurs. 2015, 16 (3):198-210en
dc.identifier.issn1532-8635en
dc.identifier.pmid25439117en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pmn.2014.06.005en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/565782en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractDespite available guidelines and efforts to improve pain management, pain remains prevalent in hospitals. The aim of this study was to explore whether pain management practices in a university hospital were in line with guidelines on acute, geriatric, and cancer pain. This was a descriptive, correlational, and point-prevalence study conducted at a university hospital with 282 adults, who were hospitalized for 24 hours and were alert and able to participate. Patient self-report data were collected with the American Pain Society questionnaire and pain management data were collected from medical records. Adequacy of treatment was measured with the Pain Management Index, calculated for prescribed and administered treatments. The mean age of participants was 68.9 years (SD = 17; range 18-100); 49% were women; and 72% were on medical services. Pain assessment was documented for 57% of patients, of those, 27% had pain severity documented with a standardized scale. Most patients (85%) were prescribed analgesics and multimodal therapy was prescribed for 60%. Prescribed treatment was adequate for 78% of patients, whereas 64% were administered adequate treatment. The odds of receiving adequate treatment were higher (odds ratio, 3.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.38-8.60) when pain severity was documented. Nonpharmacologic methods were used by 34% of patients. Although the majority of patients had an analgesic prescription, many did not receive adequate treatment. The use of pain severity scales was associated with the provision of more adequate pain treatment. To provide quality pain management, pain assessment needs to be improved and available treatments used to meet patient needs.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Science Incen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1016/j.pmn.2014.06.005en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Pain management nursing : official journal of the American Society of Pain Management Nursesen
dc.subject.meshPain Managementen
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms/complications*en
dc.subject.meshPain/drug therapyen
dc.subject.meshPatientsen
dc.titleQuality pain management practices in a university hospital.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Univ Iceland, Landspitali, Fac Nursing, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland [ 2 ] Univ Wisconsin, Sch Nursing, Madison, WI USA [ 3 ] Univ Iceland, Sch Publ Hlth, IS-101 Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalPain management nursing : official journal of the American Society of Pain Management Nursesen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractDespite available guidelines and efforts to improve pain management, pain remains prevalent in hospitals. The aim of this study was to explore whether pain management practices in a university hospital were in line with guidelines on acute, geriatric, and cancer pain. This was a descriptive, correlational, and point-prevalence study conducted at a university hospital with 282 adults, who were hospitalized for 24 hours and were alert and able to participate. Patient self-report data were collected with the American Pain Society questionnaire and pain management data were collected from medical records. Adequacy of treatment was measured with the Pain Management Index, calculated for prescribed and administered treatments. The mean age of participants was 68.9 years (SD = 17; range 18-100); 49% were women; and 72% were on medical services. Pain assessment was documented for 57% of patients, of those, 27% had pain severity documented with a standardized scale. Most patients (85%) were prescribed analgesics and multimodal therapy was prescribed for 60%. Prescribed treatment was adequate for 78% of patients, whereas 64% were administered adequate treatment. The odds of receiving adequate treatment were higher (odds ratio, 3.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.38-8.60) when pain severity was documented. Nonpharmacologic methods were used by 34% of patients. Although the majority of patients had an analgesic prescription, many did not receive adequate treatment. The use of pain severity scales was associated with the provision of more adequate pain treatment. To provide quality pain management, pain assessment needs to be improved and available treatments used to meet patient needs.


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