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dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Hannes
dc.contributor.authorTulinius, Arnar-Thor
dc.contributor.authorGeorgsdóttir, Ingibjörg
dc.contributor.authorEinarsson, Einar-Jon
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Mitesh
dc.contributor.authorHaraldsson, Ásgeir
dc.contributor.authorFransson, Per-Anders
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T14:50:16Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-12T14:50:16Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05en
dc.date.submitted2015en
dc.identifier.citationExp Brain Res. 2015, 233 (5):1651-62en
dc.identifier.issn1432-1106en
dc.identifier.pmid25772673en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00221-015-4239-3en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/566204en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractThe survival rates of infants born preterm with extremely low birth weight (ELBW ≤ 1000 g) have gradually improved over the last decades. However, these infants risk to sustain long-term disorders related to poor neurodevelopment. The objective was to determine whether adolescents born with ELBW have decreased postural control and stability adaptation. Twenty-nine ELBW subjects performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing by repeated calf vibration. Their results were compared with twenty-one age- and gender-matched controls born after full-term pregnancy. The ELBW group had significantly decreased stability compared with controls in anteroposterior direction, both during the easier quiet stance posturography (p = 0.007) and during balance perturbations (p = 0.007). The ELBW group had similar stability decrease in lateral direction during balance perturbations (p = 0.013). Statistically, the stability decreases were similar with eyes closed and open, but proportionally larger with eyes open in both directions. Both groups manifested significant adaptation (p ≤ 0.023) to the balance perturbations in anteroposterior direction, though this adaptation process could not compensate for the general stability deficits caused by ELBW on postural control. Hence, adolescent survivors of ELBW commonly suffer long-term deficits in postural control, manifested as use of substantially more recorded energy on performing stability regulating high-frequency movements and declined stability with closed and open eyes both in anteroposterior and lateral direction. The determined relationship between premature birth and long-term functional deficits advocates that interventions should be developed to provide preventive care in neonatal care units and later on in life.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1007/s00221-015-4239-3en
dc.relation.urlhttp://download.springer.com/static/pdf/356/art%253A10.1007%252Fs00221-015-4239-3.pdf?originUrl=http%3A%2F%2Flink.springer.com%2Farticle%2F10.1007%2Fs00221-015-4239-3&token2=exp=1439391553~acl=%2Fstatic%2Fpdf%2F356%2Fart%25253A10.1007%25252Fs00221-015-4239-3.pdf%3ForiginUrl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Flink.springer.com%252Farticle%252F10.1007%252Fs00221-015-4239-3*~hmac=94282f2ab8dac9d541a0e5513dc28be09953805377382a1d04fa868fdaf2d7b4en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Experimental brain researchen
dc.subjectFyrirburaren
dc.subject.meshInfant, Extremely Low Birth Weighten
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshPosture/abnormalitiesen
dc.titleDecreased postural control in adolescents born with extremely low birth weight.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland [ 2 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 3 ] State Diagnost & Counseling Ctr, Kopavogur, Iceland [ 4 ] Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden [ 5 ] Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Neurootol, London, England [ 6 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Childrens Hosp Iceland, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalExperimental brain researchen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractThe survival rates of infants born preterm with extremely low birth weight (ELBW ≤ 1000 g) have gradually improved over the last decades. However, these infants risk to sustain long-term disorders related to poor neurodevelopment. The objective was to determine whether adolescents born with ELBW have decreased postural control and stability adaptation. Twenty-nine ELBW subjects performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing by repeated calf vibration. Their results were compared with twenty-one age- and gender-matched controls born after full-term pregnancy. The ELBW group had significantly decreased stability compared with controls in anteroposterior direction, both during the easier quiet stance posturography (p = 0.007) and during balance perturbations (p = 0.007). The ELBW group had similar stability decrease in lateral direction during balance perturbations (p = 0.013). Statistically, the stability decreases were similar with eyes closed and open, but proportionally larger with eyes open in both directions. Both groups manifested significant adaptation (p ≤ 0.023) to the balance perturbations in anteroposterior direction, though this adaptation process could not compensate for the general stability deficits caused by ELBW on postural control. Hence, adolescent survivors of ELBW commonly suffer long-term deficits in postural control, manifested as use of substantially more recorded energy on performing stability regulating high-frequency movements and declined stability with closed and open eyes both in anteroposterior and lateral direction. The determined relationship between premature birth and long-term functional deficits advocates that interventions should be developed to provide preventive care in neonatal care units and later on in life.


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