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dc.contributor.authorShahana, S
dc.contributor.authorBjornsson, E
dc.contributor.authorLudviksdottir, D
dc.contributor.authorJanson, C
dc.contributor.authorNettelbladt, O
dc.contributor.authorVenge, P
dc.contributor.authorRoomans, G M
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-30T15:34:39Z
dc.date.available2009-03-30T15:34:39Z
dc.date.issued2005-04-01
dc.date.submitted2009-03-30
dc.identifier.citationRespir Med. 2005, 99(4):429-43en
dc.identifier.issn0954-6111
dc.identifier.pmid15763449
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rmed.2004.08.013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/57953
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractEpithelial damage is commonly found in airways of asthma patients. The aim of this study was to investigate epithelial damage in allergic and non-allergic asthma at the ultrastructural level. Bronchial biopsies obtained from patients with allergic asthma (n=11), non-allergic asthma (n=7), and healthy controls (n=5) were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Epithelial damage was found to be extensive in both asthma groups. Both in basal and in columnar cells, relative desmosome length was reduced by 30-40%. In columnar cells, half-desmosomes (i.e., desmosomes of which only one side was present) were frequently noticed. Eosinophils showing piece-meal degranulation were commonly observed in allergic asthma. Degranulating mast cells were more often observed in allergic asthma. Goblet cell hyperplasia was only found in allergic asthma. Lymphocytes were increased in both groups. In both groups, the lamina densa of the basal lamina was thicker than the control by about 40-50%. In allergic asthma the lamina densa was irregular with focal thickening. While there was always a tendency for changes (epithelial damage, desmosomes, degranulating mast cells, basal lamina) to be more extensive in allergic asthma compared to non-allergic asthma, there was no significant difference between the two groups in this respect. Reduced desmosomal contact may be an important factor in the epithelial shedding observed in patients with asthma.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherW.B. Saundersen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WWS-4DN13CD-2/2/ab58e52ef5120d66fa5a77b0ff405863en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAsthmaen
dc.subject.meshBasement Membraneen
dc.subject.meshBiopsyen
dc.subject.meshBronchien
dc.subject.meshBronchoscopyen
dc.subject.meshDesmosomesen
dc.subject.meshEosinophilsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGoblet Cellsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLymphocytesen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMast Cellsen
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Transmissionen
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Mucosaen
dc.titleUltrastructure of bronchial biopsies from patients with allergic and non-allergic asthmaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 571, SE 75123 Uppsala, Sweden.en
dc.identifier.journalRespiratory medicineen
html.description.abstractEpithelial damage is commonly found in airways of asthma patients. The aim of this study was to investigate epithelial damage in allergic and non-allergic asthma at the ultrastructural level. Bronchial biopsies obtained from patients with allergic asthma (n=11), non-allergic asthma (n=7), and healthy controls (n=5) were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Epithelial damage was found to be extensive in both asthma groups. Both in basal and in columnar cells, relative desmosome length was reduced by 30-40%. In columnar cells, half-desmosomes (i.e., desmosomes of which only one side was present) were frequently noticed. Eosinophils showing piece-meal degranulation were commonly observed in allergic asthma. Degranulating mast cells were more often observed in allergic asthma. Goblet cell hyperplasia was only found in allergic asthma. Lymphocytes were increased in both groups. In both groups, the lamina densa of the basal lamina was thicker than the control by about 40-50%. In allergic asthma the lamina densa was irregular with focal thickening. While there was always a tendency for changes (epithelial damage, desmosomes, degranulating mast cells, basal lamina) to be more extensive in allergic asthma compared to non-allergic asthma, there was no significant difference between the two groups in this respect. Reduced desmosomal contact may be an important factor in the epithelial shedding observed in patients with asthma.


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