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dc.contributor.authorÓskarsson, Ýmir
dc.contributor.authorGuðnason, Þórólfur
dc.contributor.authorJónsdóttir, Guðbjörg A
dc.contributor.authorKristinsson, Karl G
dc.contributor.authorBriem, Haraldur
dc.contributor.authorHaraldsson, Ásgeir
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-21T14:32:09Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-21T14:32:09Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12-16en
dc.date.submitted2016en
dc.identifier.citationPublic opinion on childhood immunisations in Iceland. 2015, 33 (51):7211-6 Vaccineen
dc.identifier.issn1873-2518en
dc.identifier.pmid26555350en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.10.125en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/594498en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, vaccine preventable diseases such as measles and pertussis have been re-emerging in Western countries, maybe because of decreasing participation in childhood vaccination programs in some countries. There is clear evidence for vaccine efficacy and the risk of adverse effects is low. This needs to be communicated to the general public. The aim of the study was to evaluate the public opinion on childhood vaccinations in Iceland.
dc.description.abstractAn internet based study was used to evaluate the opinion on childhood immunisations in Iceland. The cohort was divided in three groups: (a) general public (b) employees of the University Hospital Iceland and (c) employees (teachers and staff) of the University of Iceland. The cohorts could be stratified according to age, gender, education, household income, parenthood and residency.
dc.description.abstractResponses were received from 5584 individuals (53% response rate). When asked about childhood vaccinations in the first and second year of life, approximately 95% of participants were "positive" or "very positive", approximately 1% were "negative" or "very negative". When participants were asked whether they would have their child immunized according to the Icelandic childhood vaccination schedule, 96% were "positive" or "very positive", 1.2% were "negative" or "very negative". Similarly, 92% trust Icelandic Health authorities to decide on childhood vaccination schedule, 2.3% did not. In total, 9.3% "rather" or "strongly" agreed to the statement "I fear that vaccinations can cause severe adverse effects", 17.5% were undecided and 66.9% "disagreed" or "strongly disagreed". Individuals with higher education were more likely to disagree with this statement (OR=1.45, CI95=1.29-1.64, p<0.001) as did males (OR=1.22, CI95=1.087-1.379, p=0.001).
dc.description.abstractThis study shows a very positive attitude towards vaccinations raising expectations for an ongoing success in preventing preventable communicable diseases in childhood in Iceland.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier SCIen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.10.125en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Vaccineen
dc.subjectBólusetningaren
dc.subjectBörnen
dc.subjectViðhorfskannaniren
dc.subjectViðhorfen
dc.subject.meshImmunizationen
dc.subject.meshPublic Opinionen
dc.subject.meshVaccinesen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.titlePublic opinion on childhood immunisations in Iceland.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 2 ] Directorate Hlth Chief Epidemiologist, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 3 ] Univ Iceland, Social Sci Res Inst, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 4 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Microbiol, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland   Organization-Enhanced Name(s)      Landspitali National University Hospital [ 5 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Childrens Hosp Iceland, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland   Organization-Enhanced Name(s)      Landspitali National University Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalVaccineen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractIn recent years, vaccine preventable diseases such as measles and pertussis have been re-emerging in Western countries, maybe because of decreasing participation in childhood vaccination programs in some countries. There is clear evidence for vaccine efficacy and the risk of adverse effects is low. This needs to be communicated to the general public. The aim of the study was to evaluate the public opinion on childhood vaccinations in Iceland.
html.description.abstractAn internet based study was used to evaluate the opinion on childhood immunisations in Iceland. The cohort was divided in three groups: (a) general public (b) employees of the University Hospital Iceland and (c) employees (teachers and staff) of the University of Iceland. The cohorts could be stratified according to age, gender, education, household income, parenthood and residency.
html.description.abstractResponses were received from 5584 individuals (53% response rate). When asked about childhood vaccinations in the first and second year of life, approximately 95% of participants were "positive" or "very positive", approximately 1% were "negative" or "very negative". When participants were asked whether they would have their child immunized according to the Icelandic childhood vaccination schedule, 96% were "positive" or "very positive", 1.2% were "negative" or "very negative". Similarly, 92% trust Icelandic Health authorities to decide on childhood vaccination schedule, 2.3% did not. In total, 9.3% "rather" or "strongly" agreed to the statement "I fear that vaccinations can cause severe adverse effects", 17.5% were undecided and 66.9% "disagreed" or "strongly disagreed". Individuals with higher education were more likely to disagree with this statement (OR=1.45, CI95=1.29-1.64, p<0.001) as did males (OR=1.22, CI95=1.087-1.379, p=0.001).
html.description.abstractThis study shows a very positive attitude towards vaccinations raising expectations for an ongoing success in preventing preventable communicable diseases in childhood in Iceland.


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