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dc.contributor.authorArnardottir, Erna S
dc.contributor.authorBjornsdottir, Erla
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, Kristin A
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsdottir, Bryndis
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinn
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-27T12:33:23Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-27T12:33:23Zen
dc.date.issued2016-01en
dc.date.submitted2016en
dc.identifier.citationObstructive sleep apnoea in the general population: highly prevalent but minimal symptoms. 2016, 47 (1):194-202 Eur. Respir. J.en
dc.identifier.issn1399-3003en
dc.identifier.pmid26541533en
dc.identifier.doi10.1183/13993003.01148-2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/594965en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractThe aim was to assess the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as defined by an apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥15 in the middle-aged general population, and the interrelationship between OSA, sleep-related symptoms, sleepiness and vigilance.A general population sample of 40-65-year-old Icelanders was invited to participate in a study protocol that included a type 3 sleep study, questionnaire and a psychomotor vigilance test (PVT).Among the 415 subjects included in the study, 56.9% had no OSA (AHI <5), 24.1% had mild OSA (AHI 5-14.9), 12.5% had moderate OSA (AHI 15-29.9), 2.9% had severe OSA (AHI ≥30) and 3.6% were already diagnosed and receiving OSA treatment. However, no significant relationship was found between AHI and subjective sleepiness or clinical symptoms. A relationship with objective vigilance assessed by PVT was only found for those with AHI ≥30. Subjects already on OSA treatment and those accepting OSA treatment after participating in the study were more symptomatic and sleepier than others with similar OSA severity, as assessed by the AHI.In a middle-aged general population, approximately one in five subjects had moderate-to-severe OSA, but the majority of them were neither symptomatic nor sleepy and did not have impaired vigilance.
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali University Hospital Science Fund University of Iceland Research Fund Icelandic Centre for Research ResMed Foundation FundRefen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean Respiratory Soc Journalsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1183/13993003.01148-2015en
dc.relation.urlhttp://erj.ersjournals.com/content/erj/47/1/194.full.pdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The European respiratory journalen
dc.subjectSvefnleysien
dc.subjectKæfisvefnen
dc.subjectPAD12
dc.subjectNAF12
dc.subjectPAD12
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructiveen
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.titleObstructive sleep apnoea in the general population: highly prevalent but minimal symptoms.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Landspitali, Dept Resp Med & Sleep, IS-105 Reykjavik, Iceland, [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalThe European respiratory journalen
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
html.description.abstractThe aim was to assess the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as defined by an apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥15 in the middle-aged general population, and the interrelationship between OSA, sleep-related symptoms, sleepiness and vigilance.A general population sample of 40-65-year-old Icelanders was invited to participate in a study protocol that included a type 3 sleep study, questionnaire and a psychomotor vigilance test (PVT).Among the 415 subjects included in the study, 56.9% had no OSA (AHI <5), 24.1% had mild OSA (AHI 5-14.9), 12.5% had moderate OSA (AHI 15-29.9), 2.9% had severe OSA (AHI ≥30) and 3.6% were already diagnosed and receiving OSA treatment. However, no significant relationship was found between AHI and subjective sleepiness or clinical symptoms. A relationship with objective vigilance assessed by PVT was only found for those with AHI ≥30. Subjects already on OSA treatment and those accepting OSA treatment after participating in the study were more symptomatic and sleepier than others with similar OSA severity, as assessed by the AHI.In a middle-aged general population, approximately one in five subjects had moderate-to-severe OSA, but the majority of them were neither symptomatic nor sleepy and did not have impaired vigilance.


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