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dc.contributor.authorGudbjornsson, Brynjar Thor
dc.contributor.authorHaraldsson, Ásgeir
dc.contributor.authorEinarsdóttir, Hildur
dc.contributor.authorThorarensen, Ólafur
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-12T14:42:10Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-12T14:42:10Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12en
dc.date.submitted2016en
dc.identifier.citationPediatr. Neurol. 2015, 53 (6):503-7en
dc.identifier.issn1873-5150en
dc.identifier.pmid26463471en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2015.08.020en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/605103en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractRecognizing acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis is important to commence early treatment. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis among the entire Icelandic pediatric population according to recently promoted criteria.
dc.description.abstractThe study included all children in Iceland (<18 years) with acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis from 1990 to 2009 with a minimum of 5-year follow-up. Clinical data were gathered and radiological images reviewed. The cohort included all patients with acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis in the Icelandic pediatric population.
dc.description.abstractEighteen patients with acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis were included, the total annual incidence being 1.15/100,000 (acquired demyelinating syndromes 1.02 and multiple sclerosis 0.45/100,000). The median age at diagnosis was 14.25 years (range 1.25-17.5 years). Thirteen patients were initially diagnosed with clinically isolated syndrome, two had acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, two had multiple sclerosis, and one had neuromyelitis optica. Seven children were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis; three patients with clinically isolated syndrome developed multiple sclerosis after the age of 18 and were not included in the multiple sclerosis group. The gender ratio was equal. Of the nine girls, seven were diagnosed with clinically isolated syndrome. Most patients (11 of 18) were diagnosed during the period January through March. Oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal fluid were exclusively found in patients with multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome and 13 of 14 available magnetic resonance images revealed clear abnormalities.
dc.description.abstractThe annual incidence of acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis in Iceland was 1.15/100,000 children. The risk of progression from clinically isolated syndrome to multiple sclerosis was high. There was no female preponderance.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2015.08.020en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Pediatric neurologyen
dc.subjectMS sjúkdómuren
dc.subject.meshDemyelinating Diseases/blooden
dc.subject.meshMultiple Sclerosisen
dc.subject.meshSyndromeen
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshMyelitis, Transverseen
dc.titleNationwide Incidence of Acquired Central Nervous System Demyelination in Icelandic Children.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp Iceland, Childrens Hosp Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Diagnost Imaging, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalPediatric neurologyen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractRecognizing acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis is important to commence early treatment. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis among the entire Icelandic pediatric population according to recently promoted criteria.
html.description.abstractThe study included all children in Iceland (<18 years) with acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis from 1990 to 2009 with a minimum of 5-year follow-up. Clinical data were gathered and radiological images reviewed. The cohort included all patients with acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis in the Icelandic pediatric population.
html.description.abstractEighteen patients with acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis were included, the total annual incidence being 1.15/100,000 (acquired demyelinating syndromes 1.02 and multiple sclerosis 0.45/100,000). The median age at diagnosis was 14.25 years (range 1.25-17.5 years). Thirteen patients were initially diagnosed with clinically isolated syndrome, two had acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, two had multiple sclerosis, and one had neuromyelitis optica. Seven children were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis; three patients with clinically isolated syndrome developed multiple sclerosis after the age of 18 and were not included in the multiple sclerosis group. The gender ratio was equal. Of the nine girls, seven were diagnosed with clinically isolated syndrome. Most patients (11 of 18) were diagnosed during the period January through March. Oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal fluid were exclusively found in patients with multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome and 13 of 14 available magnetic resonance images revealed clear abnormalities.
html.description.abstractThe annual incidence of acquired demyelinating syndromes and multiple sclerosis in Iceland was 1.15/100,000 children. The risk of progression from clinically isolated syndrome to multiple sclerosis was high. There was no female preponderance.


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