Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorThorisdottir, Birna
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, Laufey
dc.contributor.authorPalsson, Gestur I
dc.contributor.authorBirgisdottir, Bryndis E
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, Inga
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-27T10:38:28Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-27T10:38:28Zen
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.date.submitted2016en
dc.identifier.citationNutrients. 2016, 8(2):75en
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643en
dc.identifier.pmid26861385en
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu8020075en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/607200en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access.en
dc.description.abstractHigh serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels have been observed in infants in Nordic countries, likely due to vitamin D supplement use. Internationally, little is known about tracking vitamin D status from infancy to childhood. Following up 1-year-old infants in our national longitudinal cohort, our aims were to study vitamin D intake and status in healthy 6-year-old Icelandic children (n = 139) and to track vitamin D status from one year of age. At six years, the mean 25(OH)D level was 56.5 nmol/L (SD 17.9) and 64% of children were vitamin D sufficient (25(OH)D ≥ 50 nmol/L). A logistic regression model adjusted for gender and breastfeeding showed that higher total vitamin D intake (Odds ratio (OR) = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08-1.49), blood samples collected in summer (OR = 8.88, 95% CI = 1.83-43.23) or autumn (OR = 5.64, 95% CI = 1.16-27.32) compared to winter/spring, and 25(OH)D at age one (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.002-1.04) were independently associated with vitamin D sufficiency at age six. The correlation between 25(OH)D at age one and six was 0.34 (p = 0.003). Our findings suggest that vitamin D status in infancy, current vitamin D intake and season are predictors of vitamin D status in early school age children. Our finding of vitamin D status tracking from infancy to childhood provides motivation for further studies on tracking and its clinical significance.
dc.description.sponsorshipIcelandic Research Fund of the Icelandic Centre for Research University of Iceland Research Fund Landspitali University Hospital Research Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPI AGen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.3390/nu8020075en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4772039/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nutrientsen
dc.subjectD vítamínen
dc.subjectBörnen
dc.subjectNUR12
dc.subjectPED12
dc.subject.mesh25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2en
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplementsen
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen
dc.subject.meshVitamin Den
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.titleVitamin D Intake and Status in 6-Year-Old Icelandic Children Followed up from Infancy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Fac Food Sci & Nutr, Unit Nutr Res, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland [ 2 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland   Organization-Enhanced Name(s)      Landspitali National University Hospital [ 3 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Childrens Hosp, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland   Organization-Enhanced Name(s)      Landspitali National University Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalNutrientsen
dc.rights.accessOpen Accessen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T15:55:34Z
html.description.abstractHigh serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels have been observed in infants in Nordic countries, likely due to vitamin D supplement use. Internationally, little is known about tracking vitamin D status from infancy to childhood. Following up 1-year-old infants in our national longitudinal cohort, our aims were to study vitamin D intake and status in healthy 6-year-old Icelandic children (n = 139) and to track vitamin D status from one year of age. At six years, the mean 25(OH)D level was 56.5 nmol/L (SD 17.9) and 64% of children were vitamin D sufficient (25(OH)D ≥ 50 nmol/L). A logistic regression model adjusted for gender and breastfeeding showed that higher total vitamin D intake (Odds ratio (OR) = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08-1.49), blood samples collected in summer (OR = 8.88, 95% CI = 1.83-43.23) or autumn (OR = 5.64, 95% CI = 1.16-27.32) compared to winter/spring, and 25(OH)D at age one (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.002-1.04) were independently associated with vitamin D sufficiency at age six. The correlation between 25(OH)D at age one and six was 0.34 (p = 0.003). Our findings suggest that vitamin D status in infancy, current vitamin D intake and season are predictors of vitamin D status in early school age children. Our finding of vitamin D status tracking from infancy to childhood provides motivation for further studies on tracking and its clinical significance.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
nutrients-08-00075 (1).pdf
Size:
434.0Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record