Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSveinsdóttir, Herdís
dc.contributor.authorRagnarsdóttir, Erla Dögg
dc.contributor.authorBlöndal, Katrín
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-27T15:02:33Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-27T15:02:33Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03en
dc.date.submitted2016en
dc.identifier.citationJ Adv Nurs. 2016, 72 (3):558-68en
dc.identifier.issn1365-2648en
dc.identifier.pmid26564786en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jan.12849en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/607247en
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the associations between praise from nurse unit managers and job satisfaction, professional practice, workload, work climate and organizational commitment of nurses caring for surgical patients.
dc.description.abstractPraise influences experiences of employees.
dc.description.abstractWeb-based, cross-sectional explorative survey design.
dc.description.abstractA structured questionnaire was used to measure praise given by nurse unit managers as perceived by nurses (n = 383; 49% response rate) working with surgical patients. Data were collected between December 2009-January 2010. Several variables assessed the major concepts under study. Binary logistic regression analysis was employed to compare nurses who receive praise very rarely/rarely as compared with very often/rather often.
dc.description.abstractPraise was received often/very often by 31·6% of participants. Compared with nurses receiving praise rarely/very rarely those who received it often/rather showed more job satisfaction, stated they had more opportunities to practice professionally, described a more positive work climate and were more committed to the organization such as being proud to work at and willing to make effort for the unit and hospital. There was no difference between the groups regarding workload. Main findings of the regression analysis were that nurses display their organizational commitment by not thinking about leaving the current workplace and those who value professional recognition are likelier to receive praise than their counterparts.
dc.description.abstractNurse unit managers should praise their staff in a realistic fashion. Such praise is cost-effective, takes short time, produces positive influences on members of their staff and may improve patient safety.
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Iceland Science Fund Landspitali University Hospital Science Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1111/jan.12849en
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jan.12849/epdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of advanced nursingen
dc.subjectHjúkrunen
dc.subjectStjórnunen
dc.subjectStarfsánægjaen
dc.subjectPEE12
dc.subjectCAD12
dc.subject.meshJob Satisfactionen
dc.subject.meshNursing Careen
dc.subject.meshOrganization and Administrationen
dc.subject.meshLeadershipen
dc.subject.meshMedical-Surgical Nursingen
dc.subject.meshWorkplaceen
dc.titlePraise matters: the influence of nurse unit managers' praise on nurses' practice, work environment and job satisfaction: a questionnaire study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Nursing, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 2 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Surg Serv, Reykjavik, Iceland   Organization-Enhanced Name(s)      Landspitali National University Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of advanced nursingen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate the associations between praise from nurse unit managers and job satisfaction, professional practice, workload, work climate and organizational commitment of nurses caring for surgical patients.
html.description.abstractPraise influences experiences of employees.
html.description.abstractWeb-based, cross-sectional explorative survey design.
html.description.abstractA structured questionnaire was used to measure praise given by nurse unit managers as perceived by nurses (n = 383; 49% response rate) working with surgical patients. Data were collected between December 2009-January 2010. Several variables assessed the major concepts under study. Binary logistic regression analysis was employed to compare nurses who receive praise very rarely/rarely as compared with very often/rather often.
html.description.abstractPraise was received often/very often by 31·6% of participants. Compared with nurses receiving praise rarely/very rarely those who received it often/rather showed more job satisfaction, stated they had more opportunities to practice professionally, described a more positive work climate and were more committed to the organization such as being proud to work at and willing to make effort for the unit and hospital. There was no difference between the groups regarding workload. Main findings of the regression analysis were that nurses display their organizational commitment by not thinking about leaving the current workplace and those who value professional recognition are likelier to receive praise than their counterparts.
html.description.abstractNurse unit managers should praise their staff in a realistic fashion. Such praise is cost-effective, takes short time, produces positive influences on members of their staff and may improve patient safety.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record