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dc.contributor.authorWangel, Anne-Marie
dc.contributor.authorRyding, Elsa Lena
dc.contributor.authorSchei, Berit
dc.contributor.authorÖstman, Margareta
dc.contributor.authorLukasse, Mirjam
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-12T11:33:29Z
dc.date.available2016-08-12T11:33:29Z
dc.date.issued2016-10
dc.date.submitted2016
dc.identifier.citationEmotional, physical, and sexual abuse and the association with symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress in a multi-ethnic pregnant population in southern Sweden 2016, 9:7-13 Sexual & Reproductive Healthcareen
dc.identifier.issn18775756
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.srhc.2016.04.003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/618288
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This study aims to describe the prevalence of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and analyze associations with symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress (PTS) in pregnancy, by ethnic background. Study design: This is a cross-sectional study of the Swedish data from the Bidens cohort study. Ethnicity was categorized as native and non-native Swedish-speakers. Women completed a questionnaire while attending routine antenatal care. The NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ) assessed a history of emotional, physical or sexual abuse. The Edinburgh Depression Scale-5 measured symptoms of depression. Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) included intrusion, avoidance and numbness. Results: Of 1003 women, 78.6% were native and 21.4% were non-native Swedish-speakers. Native and non-native Swedish-speakers experienced a similar proportion of lifetime abuse. Moderate emotional and physical abuse in childhood was significantly more common among non-native Swedish-speakers. Sexual abuse in adulthood was significantly more prevalent among native Swedish-speakers. Emotional and sexual abuse were significantly associated with symptoms of depression for both natives and non-natives. Physical abuse was significantly associated with symptoms of depression for non-natives only. All types of abuse were significantly associated with symptoms of PTS for both native and non-native Swedish-speakers. Adding ethnicity to the multiple binary regression analyses did not really alter the association between the different types of abuse and symptoms of depression and PTS. Conclusion: The prevalence of lifetime abuse did not differ significantly for native and non-native Swedish-speakers but there were significant differences on a more detailed level. Abuse was associated with symptoms of depression and PTS. Being a non-native Swedish-speaker did not influence the association much
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Bidens study received funding from the Daphne Program citing the numbers for Daphne II /2006/DAP-1/242/W30-CE-0120887/00-87 and for Daphne III JLS/2008/DAP3/AG/1358 - 30-CE-03125070059.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1877575616300064en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sexual & Reproductive Healthcareen
dc.subjectÞunglyndien
dc.subjectKynferðislegt ofbeldien
dc.subjectKúgunen
dc.subjectÁfallastreitaen
dc.subjectLíkamsárásiren
dc.subject.meshDepressionen
dc.subject.meshEthnic Groupsen
dc.subject.meshPhysical Abuseen
dc.subject.meshStress Disorders, Post-Traumaticen
dc.subject.meshSex Offensesen
dc.titleEmotional, physical, and sexual abuse and the association with symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress in a multi-ethnic pregnant population in southern Swedenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Health and Society, Department of Care Science, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Karolinska Institutet/University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College, Postbox 4 St. Olavs Plass, Oslo, Norway Department of Public Health and General Practice, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, NTNU/St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway, University of Ghent, Belgium, Landspitali University Hospital, Iceland, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, University of Tartu, Estonia, University of Iceland, Landspitali University Hospital, Iceland, Malmö University, Swedenen
dc.identifier.journalSexual & Reproductive Healthcareen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractObjectives: This study aims to describe the prevalence of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and analyze associations with symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress (PTS) in pregnancy, by ethnic background. Study design: This is a cross-sectional study of the Swedish data from the Bidens cohort study. Ethnicity was categorized as native and non-native Swedish-speakers. Women completed a questionnaire while attending routine antenatal care. The NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ) assessed a history of emotional, physical or sexual abuse. The Edinburgh Depression Scale-5 measured symptoms of depression. Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) included intrusion, avoidance and numbness. Results: Of 1003 women, 78.6% were native and 21.4% were non-native Swedish-speakers. Native and non-native Swedish-speakers experienced a similar proportion of lifetime abuse. Moderate emotional and physical abuse in childhood was significantly more common among non-native Swedish-speakers. Sexual abuse in adulthood was significantly more prevalent among native Swedish-speakers. Emotional and sexual abuse were significantly associated with symptoms of depression for both natives and non-natives. Physical abuse was significantly associated with symptoms of depression for non-natives only. All types of abuse were significantly associated with symptoms of PTS for both native and non-native Swedish-speakers. Adding ethnicity to the multiple binary regression analyses did not really alter the association between the different types of abuse and symptoms of depression and PTS. Conclusion: The prevalence of lifetime abuse did not differ significantly for native and non-native Swedish-speakers but there were significant differences on a more detailed level. Abuse was associated with symptoms of depression and PTS. Being a non-native Swedish-speaker did not influence the association much


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