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dc.contributor.authorGudmundsson, Gunnar
dc.contributor.authorMargretardottir, Olof Birna
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Martin Ingi
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Tamara B
dc.contributor.authorLauner, Lenore J
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Sigurdur
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, Orn
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T13:12:21Z
dc.date.available2016-08-23T13:12:21Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-28
dc.date.submitted2016
dc.identifier.citationAirflow obstruction, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk factors in the AGES Reykjavik study. Atherosclerosis 2016, 252:122-127en
dc.identifier.issn1879-1484
dc.identifier.pmid27522264
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2016.07.919
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/618676
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en
dc.description.abstractAirflow limitation, i.e. reduced forced expiratory volume in 1-s (FEV1), is associated with increased prevalence of atherosclerosis, however, causal mechanisms remain elusive. The objective of the study was to determine if the association between airflow obstruction and markers of atherosclerosis is mediated by systemic inflammation.
dc.description.abstract1154 subjects from the longitudinal AGES Reykjavik study were included. Population characteristics, systemic inflammation markers from blood (white blood cell counts (WBC) and level of C-reactive protein (CRP)) were compared between patients with and without airflow limitation defined by reduced FEV1 on spirometry. Atherosclerosis burden was quantified by measurements of coronary artery calcium, aortic arch and distal aortic calcification in addition to carotid intimal media thickness (CIMT).
dc.description.abstractSubjects were split into four groups according to smoking status and whether airflow limitation was present. There was a higher overall burden of atherosclerosis in ever-smokers compared to never-smokers, and in individuals with airflow obstruction compared to individuals without airflow obstruction. After adjusting for population characteristics, Framingham cardiovascular risk factors and markers of systemic inflammation (WBC and CRP), there was a significantly increased aortic arch and distal aorta calcification and higher CIMT measurement in individuals with airflow obstruction compared to individuals without airflow obstruction. After adjusting for population characteristics, Framingham cardiovascular risk factors and markers of systemic inflammation (WBC and CRP), there was a significantly increased aortic arch and distal aorta calcification and higher CIMT measurement in individuals with airflow obstruction compared to individuals without airflow obstruction.
dc.description.abstractSystemic inflammation (WBC and CRP) does not appear to mediate the association between airflow limitation and atherosclerosis. Only airflow limitation and not systemic inflammation (WBC and CRP) appears to be an independent predictor of atherosclerosis.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute on Aging, US National Institutes of Health (grant N01-AG012100), the National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, Hjartavernd (Icelandic Heart Association), and the Althingi (the Icelandic Parliament). Gunnar Gudmundsson was funded by Landspitali Scientific Fund and by the Icelandic Research Fund, Project Grant 90414021 and 90414022.en
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2016.07.919en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Atherosclerosisen
dc.subjectÆðakölkunen
dc.subjectLangvinn lungnateppaen
dc.subjectÁhættuþættiren
dc.subjectPAD12
dc.subject.meshAtherosclerosisen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructiveen
dc.subject.meshInflammationen
dc.titleAirflow obstruction, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk factors in the AGES Reykjavik study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Respiratory Medicine and Sleep, Landspitali National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: ggudmund@landspitali.is. 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. 3Department of Anesthesia, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. 4Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography, and Biometry, National Institute on Aging, United States. 5The Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland. 6Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; The Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalAtherosclerosisen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractAirflow limitation, i.e. reduced forced expiratory volume in 1-s (FEV1), is associated with increased prevalence of atherosclerosis, however, causal mechanisms remain elusive. The objective of the study was to determine if the association between airflow obstruction and markers of atherosclerosis is mediated by systemic inflammation.
html.description.abstract1154 subjects from the longitudinal AGES Reykjavik study were included. Population characteristics, systemic inflammation markers from blood (white blood cell counts (WBC) and level of C-reactive protein (CRP)) were compared between patients with and without airflow limitation defined by reduced FEV1 on spirometry. Atherosclerosis burden was quantified by measurements of coronary artery calcium, aortic arch and distal aortic calcification in addition to carotid intimal media thickness (CIMT).
html.description.abstractSubjects were split into four groups according to smoking status and whether airflow limitation was present. There was a higher overall burden of atherosclerosis in ever-smokers compared to never-smokers, and in individuals with airflow obstruction compared to individuals without airflow obstruction. After adjusting for population characteristics, Framingham cardiovascular risk factors and markers of systemic inflammation (WBC and CRP), there was a significantly increased aortic arch and distal aorta calcification and higher CIMT measurement in individuals with airflow obstruction compared to individuals without airflow obstruction. After adjusting for population characteristics, Framingham cardiovascular risk factors and markers of systemic inflammation (WBC and CRP), there was a significantly increased aortic arch and distal aorta calcification and higher CIMT measurement in individuals with airflow obstruction compared to individuals without airflow obstruction.
html.description.abstractSystemic inflammation (WBC and CRP) does not appear to mediate the association between airflow limitation and atherosclerosis. Only airflow limitation and not systemic inflammation (WBC and CRP) appears to be an independent predictor of atherosclerosis.


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