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dc.contributor.authorRaatikainen, M J Pekka
dc.contributor.authorArnar, David O
dc.contributor.authorMerkely, Bela
dc.contributor.authorCamm, A John
dc.contributor.authorHindricks, Gerhardt
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-29T13:11:50Z
dc.date.available2016-08-29T13:11:50Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.date.submitted2016
dc.identifier.citationAccess to and clinical use of cardiac implantable electronic devices and interventional electrophysiological procedures in the European Society of Cardiology Countries: 2016 Report from the European Heart Rhythm Association. 2016, 18 Suppl 3:1-79 Europaceen
dc.identifier.issn1532-2092
dc.identifier.pmid27496955
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/europace/euw244
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/619021
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this analysis was to provide comprehensive information on the access to and use of cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) and catheter ablation therapy in the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) area.
dc.description.abstractThe European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has been collecting descriptive and quantitative data on invasive arrhythmia therapies since 2008. This year 50 of the 56 ESC member countries provided data for the EHRA White Book. Up-to-date information on procedure rates for the last 5 years together with information on demographics, economy, vital statistics, local healthcare systems, and training activities is presented for each country and the 5 geographical ESC regions. Our analysis indicated that considerable heterogeneity in the access to arrhythmia therapies still exists across the ESC area. In 2015, the CIED implantation rates per million population were highest in the Western followed by the Southern and Northern European countries. The catheter ablation activity was largest in the Western followed by the Northern and Southern areas. Overall, the procedure rates were 3-10 times higher in the European than in the non-European ESC countries. Economic resources were not the only driver for utilization of arrhythmia therapies as in some Eastern European countries with relative low gross domestic product the procedure rates exceeded the average values.
dc.description.abstractThese data will help the healthcare professionals and stakeholders to identify and to understand in more depth the trends, disparities, and gaps in cardiac arrhythmia care and thereby promote harmonization of cardiac arrhythmias therapies in the ESC area.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1093/europace/euw244en
dc.relation.urlhttp://europace.oxfordjournals.org/content/europace/18/suppl_3/iii1.full.pdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Europace : European pacing, arrhythmias, and cardiac electrophysiology : journal of the working groups on cardiac pacing, arrhythmias, and cardiac cellular electrophysiology of the European Society of Cardiologyen
dc.subjectGáttatifen
dc.subjectHjartagangráðaren
dc.subjectCAR12
dc.subject.meshAtrial Fibrillationen
dc.subject.meshDefibrillatorsen
dc.subject.meshCardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devicesen
dc.subject.meshCatheter Ablationen
dc.subject.meshDefibrillators, Implantableen
dc.subject.meshPacemaker, Artificialen
dc.titleAccess to and clinical use of cardiac implantable electronic devices and interventional electrophysiological procedures in the European Society of Cardiology Countries: 2016 Report from the European Heart Rhythm Association.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1Department of Cardiology, Heart and Lung Center Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki and University of Eastern Finland, Meilahti Tower Hospital, PO Box 340, FI-00029 HUS, Kuopio, Finland pekka.raatikainen@uta.fi. 2Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Landspitali-The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 3Semmelweis University of Budapest, Heart and Vascular Center, Budapest, Hungary. 4Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, St George's University of London, London, UK ICMS, Imperial College, London, UK. 5Department of Electrophysiology, Heart Centre, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalEuropace : European pacing, arrhythmias, and cardiac electrophysiology : journal of the working groups on cardiac pacing, arrhythmias, and cardiac cellular electrophysiology of the European Society of Cardiologyen
html.description.abstractThe aim of this analysis was to provide comprehensive information on the access to and use of cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) and catheter ablation therapy in the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) area.
html.description.abstractThe European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) has been collecting descriptive and quantitative data on invasive arrhythmia therapies since 2008. This year 50 of the 56 ESC member countries provided data for the EHRA White Book. Up-to-date information on procedure rates for the last 5 years together with information on demographics, economy, vital statistics, local healthcare systems, and training activities is presented for each country and the 5 geographical ESC regions. Our analysis indicated that considerable heterogeneity in the access to arrhythmia therapies still exists across the ESC area. In 2015, the CIED implantation rates per million population were highest in the Western followed by the Southern and Northern European countries. The catheter ablation activity was largest in the Western followed by the Northern and Southern areas. Overall, the procedure rates were 3-10 times higher in the European than in the non-European ESC countries. Economic resources were not the only driver for utilization of arrhythmia therapies as in some Eastern European countries with relative low gross domestic product the procedure rates exceeded the average values.
html.description.abstractThese data will help the healthcare professionals and stakeholders to identify and to understand in more depth the trends, disparities, and gaps in cardiac arrhythmia care and thereby promote harmonization of cardiac arrhythmias therapies in the ESC area.


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