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dc.contributor.authorMedek, Helga
dc.contributor.authorHalldorsson, Thorhallur
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Ingibjörg
dc.contributor.authorGeirsson, Reynir T
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-29T15:30:11Z
dc.date.available2016-08-29T15:30:11Z
dc.date.issued2016-09
dc.date.submitted2016
dc.identifier.citationPhysical activity of relatively high intensity in mid-pregnancy predicts lower glucose tolerance levels. 2016, 95 (9):1055-62 Acta Obstet Gynecol Scanden
dc.identifier.issn1600-0412
dc.identifier.pmid27228200
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/aogs.12931
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/619025
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access.en
dc.description.abstractPhysical activity (PA) is recommended as part of therapy for patients with impaired glucose tolerance. Whether such recommendations are also justified for pregnant women is less well established. We investigated the association between PA and glucose tolerance in pregnancy.
dc.description.abstractA non-selective sample of 217 pregnant women was recruited at a routine 20 week ultrasound examination. Participants answered the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) about frequency, intensity and duration of daily physical activity in the past 7 days and underwent oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) between 24 and 28 weeks. A subset of 72 overweight/obese pregnant women wore a pedometer for 1 week with assessment of IPAQ score and pedometric correlations to this.
dc.description.abstractOf the sample, 177 attended for OGTT; 51% were overweight or obese. The mean (SD) fasting glucose was 4.5 (0.4) mmol/L, and 12% had gestational diabetes mellitus. Only one-third engaged in vigorous PA. After adjustment for pre-pregnancy BMI, age and parity, those engaging in vigorous PA had significantly lower fasting glucose levels (by 0.15 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.03-0.27) compared with those not vigorously active. This decrease was similar in both normal and overweight/obese women. There were fewer cases of gestational diabetes (p = 0.03) among the vigorously active women (3/56; 5%) than among those who were not active (19/121; 16%). No association with glucose tolerance was observed for physical activity of moderate intensity.
dc.description.abstractOnly vigorous physical activity appears beneficial with respect to maternal glucose tolerance, both among normal, overweight and obese women.
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali University Hospital Research Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1111/aogs.12931en
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/aogs.12931/epdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavicaen
dc.subjectSykursýkien
dc.subjectMeðgangaen
dc.subjectOffitaen
dc.subjectLíkamsrækten
dc.subjectOAG12
dc.subjectNUR12
dc.subject.meshDiabetes, Gestationalen
dc.subject.meshObesityen
dc.subject.meshGlucose Tolerance Testen
dc.subject.meshMotor Activityen
dc.titlePhysical activity of relatively high intensity in mid-pregnancy predicts lower glucose tolerance levels.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. 2School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 3Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. 4Center for Fetal Programming, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.en
dc.identifier.journalActa obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavicaen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractPhysical activity (PA) is recommended as part of therapy for patients with impaired glucose tolerance. Whether such recommendations are also justified for pregnant women is less well established. We investigated the association between PA and glucose tolerance in pregnancy.
html.description.abstractA non-selective sample of 217 pregnant women was recruited at a routine 20 week ultrasound examination. Participants answered the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) about frequency, intensity and duration of daily physical activity in the past 7 days and underwent oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) between 24 and 28 weeks. A subset of 72 overweight/obese pregnant women wore a pedometer for 1 week with assessment of IPAQ score and pedometric correlations to this.
html.description.abstractOf the sample, 177 attended for OGTT; 51% were overweight or obese. The mean (SD) fasting glucose was 4.5 (0.4) mmol/L, and 12% had gestational diabetes mellitus. Only one-third engaged in vigorous PA. After adjustment for pre-pregnancy BMI, age and parity, those engaging in vigorous PA had significantly lower fasting glucose levels (by 0.15 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.03-0.27) compared with those not vigorously active. This decrease was similar in both normal and overweight/obese women. There were fewer cases of gestational diabetes (p = 0.03) among the vigorously active women (3/56; 5%) than among those who were not active (19/121; 16%). No association with glucose tolerance was observed for physical activity of moderate intensity.
html.description.abstractOnly vigorous physical activity appears beneficial with respect to maternal glucose tolerance, both among normal, overweight and obese women.


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