Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKlinke, Marianne E
dc.contributor.authorHjaltason, Haukur
dc.contributor.authorHafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B
dc.contributor.authorJónsdóttir, Helga
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-30T13:35:47Z
dc.date.available2016-08-30T13:35:47Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-10
dc.date.submitted2016
dc.identifier.citationSpatial neglect in stroke patients after discharge from rehabilitation to own home: a mixed method study. Disabil Rehabil. 2016, 38(24-26):2429-2444en
dc.identifier.issn1464-5165
dc.identifier.pmid26750434
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/09638288.2015.1130176
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/619064
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractPurpose To explore the usefulness of conventional tests for assessing spatial neglect and contrast these tests with daily challenges encountered by patients after discharge from rehabilitation to home. Methods A mixed method prospective study of 15 patients with neglect after a right hemisphere stroke, <1 month after discharge to home. Data were obtained from: (1) Catherine Bergego Scale (CBS), (2) star cancellation and figure copying and (3) observations and interviews. Qualitative data were analysed with content analysis and quantitative data with non-parametric statistics. The data were presented in a 'mixing matrix' and integrated by 'following threads'. Finally, a synthesis was written into a vignette. Results The CBS significantly underestimated fluctuations and did not capture important items of neglect. The star cancellation and figure copying did not identify neglect in mildly affected participants. Left starting point in the star cancellation and a characteristic process of drawing in figure copying were observed in all participants. Conclusion Traditional numerical interpretations of paper-pencil tests inadequately confirmed mild neglect. Starting points of the star cancellation and observation of drawing should be incorporated into screening procedures. Assessment strategies need improvement to identify patients with subtle forms of neglect. Implications for Rehabilitation Findings demonstrate that identification of spatial neglect and the way symptoms of neglect impact on daily life functioning of stroke patients must be carefully pursued by health-care professionals working in stroke rehabilitation. Areas that should receive professional attention in the rehabilitation process include: preparing patients and their family for fluctuations related to neglect in the patient's own home, locating issues that might impact safety, and identifying unique factors that either enhance or diminish neglect within each patient's daily life context. The results of this study could be used to develop more wide-ranging assessment strategies to assist health-care professionals in identifying neglect after hospital discharge, for instance by expanding existing ecological assessment tools and including qualitative evaluation of test performance in paper-pencil tests, such as the star cancellation and figure copying.
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.3109/09638288.2015.1130176en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Disability and rehabilitationen
dc.subjectHeilablóðfallen
dc.subjectEndurhæfingen
dc.subjectRAN12
dc.subjectNEU12
dc.subjectCAD12
dc.subject.meshPatientsen
dc.subject.meshStrokeen
dc.subject.meshActivities of Daily Livingen
dc.subject.meshDisabled Persons/rehabilitationen
dc.subject.meshPerceptual Disordersen
dc.titleSpatial neglect in stroke patients after discharge from rehabilitation to own home: a mixed method study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1a Faculty of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland , Reykjavik , Iceland ; 2b Neurological Department , Landspitali, The National University Hospital of Iceland , Reykjavik , Iceland ; 3c Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland , Reykjavik , Iceland ; 4d Department of Rehabilitation , Nursing Science and Sport, Rudolf Magnus Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht , The Netherlands.en
dc.identifier.journalDisability and rehabilitationen
dc.rights.accessClosed - Lokaðen
html.description.abstractPurpose To explore the usefulness of conventional tests for assessing spatial neglect and contrast these tests with daily challenges encountered by patients after discharge from rehabilitation to home. Methods A mixed method prospective study of 15 patients with neglect after a right hemisphere stroke, <1 month after discharge to home. Data were obtained from: (1) Catherine Bergego Scale (CBS), (2) star cancellation and figure copying and (3) observations and interviews. Qualitative data were analysed with content analysis and quantitative data with non-parametric statistics. The data were presented in a 'mixing matrix' and integrated by 'following threads'. Finally, a synthesis was written into a vignette. Results The CBS significantly underestimated fluctuations and did not capture important items of neglect. The star cancellation and figure copying did not identify neglect in mildly affected participants. Left starting point in the star cancellation and a characteristic process of drawing in figure copying were observed in all participants. Conclusion Traditional numerical interpretations of paper-pencil tests inadequately confirmed mild neglect. Starting points of the star cancellation and observation of drawing should be incorporated into screening procedures. Assessment strategies need improvement to identify patients with subtle forms of neglect. Implications for Rehabilitation Findings demonstrate that identification of spatial neglect and the way symptoms of neglect impact on daily life functioning of stroke patients must be carefully pursued by health-care professionals working in stroke rehabilitation. Areas that should receive professional attention in the rehabilitation process include: preparing patients and their family for fluctuations related to neglect in the patient's own home, locating issues that might impact safety, and identifying unique factors that either enhance or diminish neglect within each patient's daily life context. The results of this study could be used to develop more wide-ranging assessment strategies to assist health-care professionals in identifying neglect after hospital discharge, for instance by expanding existing ecological assessment tools and including qualitative evaluation of test performance in paper-pencil tests, such as the star cancellation and figure copying.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record