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dc.contributor.authorHrolfsdottir, Laufey
dc.contributor.authorSchalkwijk, Casper G
dc.contributor.authorBirgisdottir, Bryndis E
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg
dc.contributor.authorMaslova, Ekaterina
dc.contributor.authorGranström, Charlotta
dc.contributor.authorStrøm, Marin
dc.contributor.authorOlsen, Sjurdur F
dc.contributor.authorHalldorsson, Thorhallur I
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-30T12:17:21Z
dc.date.available2016-09-30T12:17:21Z
dc.date.issued2016-10
dc.date.submitted2016
dc.identifier.citationMaternal diet, gestational weight gain, and inflammatory markers during pregnancy. 2016, 24 (10):2133-9 Obesity (Silver Spring)en
dc.identifier.issn1930-739X
dc.identifier.pmid27581164
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/oby.21617
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620030
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractTo examine the associations of gestational weight gain (GWG) and diet with low-grade inflammation in pregnancy.
dc.description.abstractA cross-sectional analysis of 671 pregnant women was performed, and diet was assessed in gestational week 30. GWG was recorded in weeks 30 and ∼37 (difference between the weight recorded at these time points and pre-pregnancy weight). Markers of inflammation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α were quantified in serum from week 30.
dc.description.abstractAfter adjusting for age, pre-pregnancy BMI, parity, smoking status, and education, each 1 kg increase in GWG was associated with 3% (95% CI: 1-5) higher hsCRP and 3% (95% CI: 1-4) higher SAA concentrations, which corresponded to ∼18% to 25% increase in these biomarkers among those with excessive weight gain. GWG was inversely associated with IL-8 while no associations were found for the other inflammatory markers. With respect to diet, women in the highest compared with lowest quintile of protein intake had 26% (95% CI: 3-54) higher hsCRP concentrations. This increase appeared to be driven by intake of animal protein. A similar pattern was observed for SAA.
dc.description.abstractExcessive GWG, as well as high intake of animal protein, was associated with higher concentrations of inflammatory factors.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1002/oby.21617en
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.21617/epdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)en
dc.subjectMeðgangaen
dc.subjectMataræðien
dc.subjectLíkamsþyngden
dc.subjectNUR12
dc.subject.meshDieten
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshWeight Gainen
dc.subject.meshInflammationen
dc.titleMaternal diet, gestational weight gain, and inflammatory markers during pregnancy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. lah10@hi.is. 2Department of Epidemiology Research, Centre for Fetal Programming, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark. lah10@hi.is. 3Department of Internal Medicine, Laboratory of Metabolism and Vascular Medicine, Maastrich University Medical Center, The Netherlands. 4Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 5Department of Epidemiology Research, Centre for Fetal Programming, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark. 6Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College, London, UK. 7Danish Diabetes Academy, Odense, Denmark. 8Faculty of Natural and Health Sciences, University of the Faroe Islands, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands. 9Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.en
dc.identifier.journalObesity (Silver Spring, Md.)en
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
html.description.abstractTo examine the associations of gestational weight gain (GWG) and diet with low-grade inflammation in pregnancy.
html.description.abstractA cross-sectional analysis of 671 pregnant women was performed, and diet was assessed in gestational week 30. GWG was recorded in weeks 30 and ∼37 (difference between the weight recorded at these time points and pre-pregnancy weight). Markers of inflammation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α were quantified in serum from week 30.
html.description.abstractAfter adjusting for age, pre-pregnancy BMI, parity, smoking status, and education, each 1 kg increase in GWG was associated with 3% (95% CI: 1-5) higher hsCRP and 3% (95% CI: 1-4) higher SAA concentrations, which corresponded to ∼18% to 25% increase in these biomarkers among those with excessive weight gain. GWG was inversely associated with IL-8 while no associations were found for the other inflammatory markers. With respect to diet, women in the highest compared with lowest quintile of protein intake had 26% (95% CI: 3-54) higher hsCRP concentrations. This increase appeared to be driven by intake of animal protein. A similar pattern was observed for SAA.
html.description.abstractExcessive GWG, as well as high intake of animal protein, was associated with higher concentrations of inflammatory factors.


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