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dc.contributor.authorMarques, E A
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, V
dc.contributor.authorLang, T
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, G
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, S
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, T
dc.contributor.authorSiggeirsdottir, K
dc.contributor.authorLauner, L
dc.contributor.authorEiriksdottir, G
dc.contributor.authorHarris, T B
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-07T15:12:50Z
dc.date.available2016-12-07T15:12:50Z
dc.date.issued2016-12
dc.date.submitted2016
dc.identifier.citationAssociation of bone turnover markers with volumetric bone loss, periosteal apposition, and fracture risk in older men and women: the AGES-Reykjavik longitudinal study. 2016, 27 (12):3485-3494 Osteoporos Inten
dc.identifier.issn1433-2965
dc.identifier.pmid27341810
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00198-016-3675-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620091
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractAssociation between serum bone formation and resorption markers and cortical and trabecular bone loss and the concurrent periosteal apposition in a population-based cohort of 1069 older adults was assessed. BTM levels moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces but are not associated with fracture risk.
dc.description.abstractWe assessed whether circulating bone formation and resorption markers (BTM) were individual predictors for trabecular and cortical bone loss, periosteal expansion, and fracture risk in older adults aged 66 to 93 years from the AGES-Reykjavik study.
dc.description.abstractThe sample for the quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-derived cortical and trabecular BMD and periosteal expansion analysis consisted of 1069 participants (474 men and 595 women) who had complete baseline (2002 to 2006) and follow-up (2007 to 2011) hip QCT scans and serum baseline BTM. During the median follow-up of 11.7 years (range 5.4-12.5), 54 (11.4 %) men and 182 (30.6 %) women sustained at least one fracture of any type.
dc.description.abstractIncrease in BTM levels was associated with faster cortical and trabecular bone loss at the femoral neck and proximal femur in men and women. Higher BTM levels were positively related with periosteal expansion rate at the femoral neck in men. Markers were not associated with fracture risk.
dc.description.abstractThis data corroborates the notion from few previous studies that both envelopes are metabolically active and that BTM levels may moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces. However, our results do not support the routine use of BTM to assess fracture risk in older men and women. In light of these findings, further studies are justified to examine whether systemic markers of bone turnover might prove useful in monitoring skeletal remodeling events and the effects of current osteoporosis drugs at the periosteum.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health contract N01-AG-012100, the National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, Hjartavernd (the Icelandic Heart Association), and the Althingi (the Icelandic Parliament). EAM and TBH were supported in part by and the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Internationalen
dc.relationxen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1007/s00198-016-3675-7en
dc.relation.urlhttp://download.springer.com/static/pdf/61/art%253A10.1007%252Fs00198-016-3675-7.pdf?originUrl=http%3A%2F%2Flink.springer.com%2Farticle%2F10.1007%2Fs00198-016-3675-7&token2=exp=1481124833~acl=%2Fstatic%2Fpdf%2F61%2Fart%25253A10.1007%25252Fs00198-016-3675-7.pdf%3ForiginUrl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Flink.springer.com%252Farticle%252F10.1007%252Fs00198-016-3675-7*~hmac=d7e5e0f5ed5aec71af96de39f62b18f9c2b092b4f8f93ae1e1fa35fb62a1383cen
dc.rightsclosedAccessen
dc.subjectAldraðiren
dc.subjectBeinbroten
dc.subjectEND12
dc.subject.meshAgingen
dc.subject.meshBone Remodelingen
dc.subject.meshFractures, Boneen
dc.titleAssociation of bone turnover markers with volumetric bone loss, periosteal apposition, and fracture risk in older men and women: the AGES-Reykjavik longitudinal study.en
dc.typearticleen
dc.contributor.department1Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. elisa.marques@nih.gov. 2Icelandic Heart Association Research Institute, Kópavogur, Iceland. 3University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 4Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. 5Landspitalinn University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. 6Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 7Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.en
dc.identifier.journalOsteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USAen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractAssociation between serum bone formation and resorption markers and cortical and trabecular bone loss and the concurrent periosteal apposition in a population-based cohort of 1069 older adults was assessed. BTM levels moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces but are not associated with fracture risk.
html.description.abstractWe assessed whether circulating bone formation and resorption markers (BTM) were individual predictors for trabecular and cortical bone loss, periosteal expansion, and fracture risk in older adults aged 66 to 93 years from the AGES-Reykjavik study.
html.description.abstractThe sample for the quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-derived cortical and trabecular BMD and periosteal expansion analysis consisted of 1069 participants (474 men and 595 women) who had complete baseline (2002 to 2006) and follow-up (2007 to 2011) hip QCT scans and serum baseline BTM. During the median follow-up of 11.7 years (range 5.4-12.5), 54 (11.4 %) men and 182 (30.6 %) women sustained at least one fracture of any type.
html.description.abstractIncrease in BTM levels was associated with faster cortical and trabecular bone loss at the femoral neck and proximal femur in men and women. Higher BTM levels were positively related with periosteal expansion rate at the femoral neck in men. Markers were not associated with fracture risk.
html.description.abstractThis data corroborates the notion from few previous studies that both envelopes are metabolically active and that BTM levels may moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces. However, our results do not support the routine use of BTM to assess fracture risk in older men and women. In light of these findings, further studies are justified to examine whether systemic markers of bone turnover might prove useful in monitoring skeletal remodeling events and the effects of current osteoporosis drugs at the periosteum.


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