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dc.contributor.authorArnar, David O
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Karl
dc.contributor.authorThorgeirsson, Gudmundur
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T15:30:32Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T15:30:32Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.citationGenetics of cardiovascular diseases: lessons learned from a decade of genomics research in Iceland., 50 (5-6):260-265 Scand. Cardiovasc. J.en
dc.identifier.issn1651-2006
dc.identifier.pmid27572422
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14017431.2016.1230679
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620102
dc.descriptionNeðst á síðunni er hægt að nálgast greinina í heild sinni með því að smella á hlekkinn View/Open To access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractIn the past 10 years, large-scale genotyping has led to discoveries of sequence variants that confer the risk of many common and complex diseases. Due to pioneering work done, in large part, at deCODE genetics in Reykjavik, discoveries from Iceland have contributed substantially to key advances in population genetics. In cardiovascular medicine, a number of discoveries have been made, uncovering sequence variants that are associated with disorders such as coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, sick sinus syndrome, peripheral vascular disease, aortic aneurysm, and ischemic stroke. Thus, a wealth of genetic data has been accumulated in cardiology and has enhanced our understanding of a number of diseases. In many cases, these findings offer new mechanistic clues into the pathophysiology of complex cardiovascular diseases and may point toward novel therapeutic approaches in drug therapy. The next important step is to begin to transform these findings into practical clinical knowledge with the aim of improving the delivery of cardiovascular health care.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/14017431.2016.1230679?needAccess=trueen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Scandinavian cardiovascular journal : SCJen
dc.subjectBlóðrásarsjúkdómaren
dc.subjectArfgengien
dc.subjectErfðafræðien
dc.subjectCAR12
dc.subject.meshGeneticsen
dc.subject.meshAtrial Fibrillationen
dc.subject.meshCoronary Artery Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshGenome-Wide Association Studyen
dc.subject.meshPrecision Medicineen
dc.subject.meshSick Sinus Syndromeen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.titleGenetics of cardiovascular diseases: lessons learned from a decade of genomics research in Iceland.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Landspitali, Div Cardiol, Dept Med, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 3 ] deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian cardiovascular journal : SCJen
dc.rights.accessClosed - Lokaðen
html.description.abstractIn the past 10 years, large-scale genotyping has led to discoveries of sequence variants that confer the risk of many common and complex diseases. Due to pioneering work done, in large part, at deCODE genetics in Reykjavik, discoveries from Iceland have contributed substantially to key advances in population genetics. In cardiovascular medicine, a number of discoveries have been made, uncovering sequence variants that are associated with disorders such as coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, sick sinus syndrome, peripheral vascular disease, aortic aneurysm, and ischemic stroke. Thus, a wealth of genetic data has been accumulated in cardiology and has enhanced our understanding of a number of diseases. In many cases, these findings offer new mechanistic clues into the pathophysiology of complex cardiovascular diseases and may point toward novel therapeutic approaches in drug therapy. The next important step is to begin to transform these findings into practical clinical knowledge with the aim of improving the delivery of cardiovascular health care.


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