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dc.contributor.authorArnardottir, Erna Sif
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinn
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-24T15:16:09Z
dc.date.available2017-03-24T15:16:09Z
dc.date.issued2016-12
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.citationQuantifying Airflow Limitation and Snoring During Sleep. 2016, 11 (4):421-434 Sleep Med Clinen
dc.identifier.issn1556-4088
dc.identifier.pmid28118867
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsmc.2016.07.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620123
dc.description.abstractTraditional techniques to assess respiratory disturbances during sleep allow the accurate diagnosis of moderate and severe cases of obstructive sleep apnea but have serious limitations in mild obstructive sleep apnea and cases with signs of obstructive breathing during sleep without apneas and hypopneas. This article describes advantages and limitations of available techniques to measure obstructive breathing during sleep by measuring flow limitation, respiratory effort, and snoring. Standardization of these techniques is crucial for moving the field further and understanding the pathophysiologic role of obstructive breathing itself, and not solely focusing on the associated outcomes of arousals and oxygen desaturations.
dc.description.sponsorshipNox Medicalen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1556407X16300625en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sleep medicine clinicsen
dc.subjectKæfisvefnen
dc.subjectÖndunarfærasjúkdómaren
dc.subjectHroturen
dc.subjectPAD12en
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructiveen
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Function Testsen
dc.subject.meshSnoringen
dc.titleQuantifying Airflow Limitation and Snoring During Sleep.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNatl Univ Hosp Iceland, Landspitali, Dept Resp Med & Sleepen
dc.identifier.journalSleep medicine clinicsen
dc.rights.accessClosed - Lokaðen
html.description.abstractTraditional techniques to assess respiratory disturbances during sleep allow the accurate diagnosis of moderate and severe cases of obstructive sleep apnea but have serious limitations in mild obstructive sleep apnea and cases with signs of obstructive breathing during sleep without apneas and hypopneas. This article describes advantages and limitations of available techniques to measure obstructive breathing during sleep by measuring flow limitation, respiratory effort, and snoring. Standardization of these techniques is crucial for moving the field further and understanding the pathophysiologic role of obstructive breathing itself, and not solely focusing on the associated outcomes of arousals and oxygen desaturations.


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