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dc.contributor.authorHaraldsdottir, Alfheidur
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, Laufey
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsdottir, Unnur A
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorTryggvadottir, Laufey
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Tamara B
dc.contributor.authorLauner, Lenore J
dc.contributor.authorMucci, Lorelei A
dc.contributor.authorGiovannucci, Edward L
dc.contributor.authorAdami, Hans-Olov
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.contributor.authorTorfadottir, Johanna E
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-07T10:46:04Z
dc.date.available2017-04-07T10:46:04Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.citationEarly Life Residence, Fish Consumption, and Risk of Breast Cancer. 2017, 26 (3):346-354 Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.en
dc.identifier.issn1538-7755
dc.identifier.pmid27765796
dc.identifier.doi10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0473-T
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620145
dc.descriptionNeðst á síðunni er hægt að nálgast greinina í heild sinni með því að smella á hlekkinn View/Open To access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractBackground: Little is known about fish intake throughout the life course and the risk of breast cancer.Methods: We used data on the first residence of 9,340 women born 1908 to 1935 in the Reykjavik Study as well as food frequency data for different periods of life from a subgroup of the cohort entering the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study (n = 2,882).Results: During a mean follow-up of 27.3 years, 744 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in the Reykjavik Study. An inverse association of breast cancer was observed among women who lived through the puberty period in coastal villages, compared with women residing in the capital area [HR, 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.61-0.99]. In the subgroup analysis of this Icelandic population, generally characterized by high fish intake, we found an indication of lower risk of breast cancer among women with high fish consumption (more than 4 portions per week) in adolescence (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.44-1.13) and midlife (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22-0.97), compared with low consumers (2 portions per week or less). No association was found for fish liver oil consumption in any time period, which could be due to lack of a reference group with low omega-3 fatty acids intake in the study group.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that very high fish consumption in early to midlife may be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer.Impact: Very high fish consumption in early adulthood to midlife may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 346-54. ©2016 AACR.
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging Icelandic Heart Association Icelandic Parliament Icelandic Centre for Research, RANNIS Public Health Fund of the Icelandic Directorate of Healthen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Cancer Researchen
dc.relation.urlhttp://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/cebp/early/2016/10/08/1055-9965.EPI-16-0473-T.full.pdfen
dc.relation.urlhttp://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2016/10/08/1055-9965.EPI-16-0473-Ten
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncologyen
dc.subjectSjávarafurðiren
dc.subjectMataræðien
dc.subjectBrjóstakrabbameinen
dc.subjectUngt fólken
dc.subjectNUR12en
dc.subject.meshFish Productsen
dc.subject.meshDieten
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasmsen
dc.titleEarly Life Residence, Fish Consumption, and Risk of Breast Cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Food Sci & Human Nutr, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 3 ] Univ Iceland, Unit Nutr Res, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 4 ] Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Reykjavik, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 5 ] Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 6 ] Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden [ 7 ] Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland [ 8 ] Iceland Canc Registry, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 9 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 10 ] NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, Intramural Res Program, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 11 ] Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 12 ] Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA [ 13 ] Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USAen
dc.identifier.journalCancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncologyen
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T16:29:06Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Little is known about fish intake throughout the life course and the risk of breast cancer.Methods: We used data on the first residence of 9,340 women born 1908 to 1935 in the Reykjavik Study as well as food frequency data for different periods of life from a subgroup of the cohort entering the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study (n = 2,882).Results: During a mean follow-up of 27.3 years, 744 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in the Reykjavik Study. An inverse association of breast cancer was observed among women who lived through the puberty period in coastal villages, compared with women residing in the capital area [HR, 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.61-0.99]. In the subgroup analysis of this Icelandic population, generally characterized by high fish intake, we found an indication of lower risk of breast cancer among women with high fish consumption (more than 4 portions per week) in adolescence (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.44-1.13) and midlife (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22-0.97), compared with low consumers (2 portions per week or less). No association was found for fish liver oil consumption in any time period, which could be due to lack of a reference group with low omega-3 fatty acids intake in the study group.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that very high fish consumption in early to midlife may be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer.Impact: Very high fish consumption in early adulthood to midlife may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 346-54. ©2016 AACR.


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