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dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Sigridur Sia
dc.contributor.authorThome, Marga
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, Thora
dc.contributor.authorLydsdottir, Linda Bara
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Jon Fridrik
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, Halldora
dc.contributor.authorSwahnberg, Katarina
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-30T15:27:14Z
dc.date.available2017-05-30T15:27:14Z
dc.date.issued2017-02
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.citationPartner relationship, social support and perinatal distress among pregnant Icelandic women. 2017, 30 (1):e46-e55 Women Birthen
dc.identifier.issn1878-1799
dc.identifier.pmid27616767
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.wombi.2016.08.005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620203
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractIt is inferred that perinatal distress has adverse effects on the prospective mother and the health of the foetus/infant. More knowledge is needed to identify which symptoms of perinatal distress should be assessed during pregnancy and to shed light on the impact of women's satisfaction with their partner relationship on perinatal distress.
dc.description.abstractThe current study aimed to generate knowledge about the association of the partner relationship and social support when women are dealing with perinatal distress expressed by symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress.
dc.description.abstractA structured interview was conducted with 562 Icelandic women who were screened three times during pregnancy with the Edinburgh Depression Scale and the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale. Of these, 360 had symptoms of distress and 202 belonged to a non-distress group. The women answered the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and the Dyadic Adjustment Scale. The study had a multicentre prospective design allowing for exploration of association with perinatal distress.
dc.description.abstractWomen who were dissatisfied in their partner relationship were four times more likely to experience perinatal distress. Women with perinatal distress scored highest on the DASS Stress Subscale and the second highest scores were found on the Anxiety Subscale.
dc.description.abstractSatisfaction in partner relationship is related to perinatal distress and needs to be assessed when health care professionals take care of distressed pregnant women, her partner and her family. Assessment of stress and anxiety should be included in the evaluation of perinatal distress, along with symptoms of depression.
dc.description.sponsorshipPrimary Health Care of Reykjavik, Iceland The Primary Health Care of Akureyri, Iceland The National University Hospital of Icelanden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://ac.els-cdn.com/S1871519216300919/1-s2.0-S1871519216300919-main.pdf?_tid=c6d886bc-4549-11e7-86a7-00000aab0f27&acdnat=1496157063_85965d67e311f2e77885e218278050f3en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Women and birth : journal of the Australian College of Midwivesen
dc.subjectMeðgangaen
dc.subjectFæðingarþunglyndien
dc.subjectÞunglyndien
dc.subjectFæðingen
dc.subjectMakaren
dc.subjectSamskiptien
dc.subjectOAG12en
dc.subjectMIW12en
dc.subjectPSY12en
dc.subjectPSC12en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAnxietyen
dc.subject.meshDepressionen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshInterpersonal Relationsen
dc.subject.meshInterviews as Topicen
dc.subject.meshMood Disordersen
dc.subject.meshMothersen
dc.subject.meshPersonal Satisfactionen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPregnant Womenen
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Diagnosisen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSexual Partnersen
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten
dc.subject.meshSpousesen
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychologicalen
dc.subject.meshIceland
dc.titlePartner relationship, social support and perinatal distress among pregnant Icelandic women.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar/Växjö, Sweden; School of Health Sciences, University of Akureyri, Iceland. Electronic address: sia.jonsdottir@lnu.se. 2 School of Health Science, Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 3 Women's Clinic, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; School of Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 4 School of Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 5 School of Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Division of Mental Health, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; School of Business, Department of Psychology, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland. 6 Division of Mental Health, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. 7 Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar/Växjö, Sweden.en
dc.identifier.journalWomen and birth : journal of the Australian College of Midwivesen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractIt is inferred that perinatal distress has adverse effects on the prospective mother and the health of the foetus/infant. More knowledge is needed to identify which symptoms of perinatal distress should be assessed during pregnancy and to shed light on the impact of women's satisfaction with their partner relationship on perinatal distress.
html.description.abstractThe current study aimed to generate knowledge about the association of the partner relationship and social support when women are dealing with perinatal distress expressed by symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress.
html.description.abstractA structured interview was conducted with 562 Icelandic women who were screened three times during pregnancy with the Edinburgh Depression Scale and the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale. Of these, 360 had symptoms of distress and 202 belonged to a non-distress group. The women answered the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and the Dyadic Adjustment Scale. The study had a multicentre prospective design allowing for exploration of association with perinatal distress.
html.description.abstractWomen who were dissatisfied in their partner relationship were four times more likely to experience perinatal distress. Women with perinatal distress scored highest on the DASS Stress Subscale and the second highest scores were found on the Anxiety Subscale.
html.description.abstractSatisfaction in partner relationship is related to perinatal distress and needs to be assessed when health care professionals take care of distressed pregnant women, her partner and her family. Assessment of stress and anxiety should be included in the evaluation of perinatal distress, along with symptoms of depression.


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