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dc.contributor.authorLindberg, Eva
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsdottir, Bryndis
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, Karl A
dc.contributor.authorHolm, Mathias
dc.contributor.authorJohannessen, Ane
dc.contributor.authorJögi, Rain
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinn
dc.contributor.authorReal, Francisco Gomez
dc.contributor.authorSchlünssen, Vivi
dc.contributor.authorJanson, Christer
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-28T11:20:53Z
dc.date.available2017-08-28T11:20:53Z
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.citationWomen with symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing are less likely to be diagnosed and treated for sleep apnea than men. 2017, 35:17-22 Sleep Med.en
dc.identifier.issn1878-5506
dc.identifier.pmid28619177
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.sleep.2017.02.032
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620282
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractWomen are often underrepresented at sleep clinics evaluating sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). The aim of the present study was to analyze gender differences in sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment in men and women with similar symptoms of SDB.
dc.description.abstractRespiratory Health in Northern Europe (RHINE) provided information about snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), BMI and somatic diseases at baseline (1999-2001) and follow-up (2010-2012) from 4962 men and 5892 women. At follow-up participants were asked whether they had a diagnosis of and/or treatment for sleep apnea.
dc.description.abstractAmong those with symptoms of SDB (snoring and EDS), more men than women had been given the diagnosis of sleep apnea (25% vs. 14%, p < 0.001), any treatment (17% vs. 11%, p = 0.05) and CPAP (6% vs. 3%, p = 0.04) at follow-up. Predictors of receiving treatment were age, BMI, SDB symptoms at baseline and weight gain, while female gender was related to a lower probability of receiving treatment (adj. OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.3-0.5). In both genders, the symptoms of SDB increased the risk of developing hypertension (adj OR, 95% CI: 1.5, 1.2-1.8) and diabetes (1.5, 1.05-2.3), independent of age, BMI, smoking and weight gain.
dc.description.abstractSnoring females with daytime sleepiness may be under-diagnosed and under-treated for sleep apnea compared with males, despite running a similar risk of developing hypertension and diabetes.
dc.description.sponsorshipNorwegian Research Council Icelandic Research Council Aarhus universitet Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation Estonian Science Foundationen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ac.els-cdn.com/S1389945717301752/1-s2.0-S1389945717301752-main.pdf?_tid=3b5fb7e8-8be1-11e7-b39c-00000aab0f6b&acdnat=1503918694_ec560d3515598cd3193ae472db39c659en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sleep medicineen
dc.subjectKæfisvefnen
dc.subjectSvefntruflaniren
dc.subjectHroturen
dc.subjectKonuren
dc.subjectPAD12en
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea Syndromesen
dc.subject.meshSnoringen
dc.subject.meshWomenen
dc.titleWomen with symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing are less likely to be diagnosed and treated for sleep apnea than men.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci Resp Allergy & Sleep Res, Uppsala, Sweden Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 2 ] Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Resp Med & Sleep, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 3 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 4 ] Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Petioperat Sci, Surg, Umea, Sweden Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 5 ] Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Gothenburg, Sweden Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 6 ] Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Bergen, Norway Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 7 ] Tartu Univ Clin, Lung Clin, Tartu, Estonia Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 8 ] Haukeland Hosp, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Bergen, Norway Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 9 ] Aarhus Univ, Sect Environm Occupat & Hlth, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark [ 10 ] Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmarken
dc.identifier.journalSleep medicineen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractWomen are often underrepresented at sleep clinics evaluating sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). The aim of the present study was to analyze gender differences in sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment in men and women with similar symptoms of SDB.
html.description.abstractRespiratory Health in Northern Europe (RHINE) provided information about snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), BMI and somatic diseases at baseline (1999-2001) and follow-up (2010-2012) from 4962 men and 5892 women. At follow-up participants were asked whether they had a diagnosis of and/or treatment for sleep apnea.
html.description.abstractAmong those with symptoms of SDB (snoring and EDS), more men than women had been given the diagnosis of sleep apnea (25% vs. 14%, p < 0.001), any treatment (17% vs. 11%, p = 0.05) and CPAP (6% vs. 3%, p = 0.04) at follow-up. Predictors of receiving treatment were age, BMI, SDB symptoms at baseline and weight gain, while female gender was related to a lower probability of receiving treatment (adj. OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.3-0.5). In both genders, the symptoms of SDB increased the risk of developing hypertension (adj OR, 95% CI: 1.5, 1.2-1.8) and diabetes (1.5, 1.05-2.3), independent of age, BMI, smoking and weight gain.
html.description.abstractSnoring females with daytime sleepiness may be under-diagnosed and under-treated for sleep apnea compared with males, despite running a similar risk of developing hypertension and diabetes.


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