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dc.contributor.authorVangen, Siri
dc.contributor.authorBødker, Birgit
dc.contributor.authorEllingsen, Liv
dc.contributor.authorSaltvedt, Sissel
dc.contributor.authorGissler, Mika
dc.contributor.authorGeirsson, Reynir T
dc.contributor.authorNyfløt, Lill T
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-25T11:30:24Z
dc.date.available2017-09-25T11:30:24Z
dc.date.issued2017-09
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.citationMaternal deaths in the Nordic countries. 2017, 96 (9):1112-1119 Acta Obstet Gynecol Scanden
dc.identifier.issn1600-0412
dc.identifier.pmid28542709
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/aogs.13172
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620305
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractDespite the seriousness of the event, maternal deaths are substantially underreported. There is often a missed opportunity to learn from such tragedies. The aim of the study was to identify maternal deaths in the five Nordic countries, to classify causes of death based on internationally acknowledged criteria, and to identify areas that would benefit from further teaching, training or research to possibly reduce the number of maternal deaths.
dc.description.abstractWe present data for the years 2005-2013. National audit groups collected data by linkage of registers and direct reporting from hospitals. Each case was then assessed to determine the cause of death, and level of care provided. Potential improvements to care were evaluated.
dc.description.abstractWe registered 168 maternal deaths, 90 direct and 78 indirect cases. The maternal mortality ratio was 7.2/100 000 live births ranging from 6.8 to 8.1 between the countries. Cardiac disease (n = 29) was the most frequent cause of death, followed by preeclampsia (n = 24), thromboembolism (n = 20) and suicide (n = 20). Improvements to care which could potentially have made a difference to the outcome were identified in one-third of the deaths, i.e. in as many as 60% of preeclamptic, 45% of thromboembolic, and 32% of the deaths from cardiac disease.
dc.description.abstractDirect deaths exceeded indirect maternal deaths in the Nordic countries. To reduce maternal deaths, increased efforts to better implement existing clinical guidelines seem warranted, particularly for preeclampsia, thromboembolism and cardiac disease. More knowledge is also needed about what contributes to suicidal maternal deaths.
dc.description.sponsorshipSouth East Health region, Norway Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology (NFOG)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/aogs.13172/epdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavicaen
dc.subjectMæðravernden
dc.subjectMeðgangaen
dc.subjectFæðingen
dc.subjectDánarmeinen
dc.subjectOAG12en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshCause of Deathen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaternal Ageen
dc.subject.meshMaternal Health Servicesen
dc.subject.meshMaternal Mortalityen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complicationsen
dc.subject.meshRegistriesen
dc.subject.meshScandinavian and Nordic Countriesen
dc.titleMaternal deaths in the Nordic countries.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1 Norwegian National Advisory Unit for Women's Health, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. 2 Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. 3 Nordsjaellands Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark. 4 Department of Obstetrics, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. 5 Department of Obstetrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. 6 National Institute for Health and Welfare Finland, Helsinki, Finland. 7 Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. 8 Landspitali University Hospital/University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalActa obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavicaen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractDespite the seriousness of the event, maternal deaths are substantially underreported. There is often a missed opportunity to learn from such tragedies. The aim of the study was to identify maternal deaths in the five Nordic countries, to classify causes of death based on internationally acknowledged criteria, and to identify areas that would benefit from further teaching, training or research to possibly reduce the number of maternal deaths.
html.description.abstractWe present data for the years 2005-2013. National audit groups collected data by linkage of registers and direct reporting from hospitals. Each case was then assessed to determine the cause of death, and level of care provided. Potential improvements to care were evaluated.
html.description.abstractWe registered 168 maternal deaths, 90 direct and 78 indirect cases. The maternal mortality ratio was 7.2/100 000 live births ranging from 6.8 to 8.1 between the countries. Cardiac disease (n = 29) was the most frequent cause of death, followed by preeclampsia (n = 24), thromboembolism (n = 20) and suicide (n = 20). Improvements to care which could potentially have made a difference to the outcome were identified in one-third of the deaths, i.e. in as many as 60% of preeclamptic, 45% of thromboembolic, and 32% of the deaths from cardiac disease.
html.description.abstractDirect deaths exceeded indirect maternal deaths in the Nordic countries. To reduce maternal deaths, increased efforts to better implement existing clinical guidelines seem warranted, particularly for preeclampsia, thromboembolism and cardiac disease. More knowledge is also needed about what contributes to suicidal maternal deaths.


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