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dc.contributor.authorAndresdottir, Gudbjorg Thora
dc.contributor.authorHjaltason, Haukur
dc.contributor.authorRagnarsdottir, Maria
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-24T15:43:19Z
dc.date.available2017-10-24T15:43:19Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-25
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.citationIrregular amplitude and frequency of respiratory movements in hemispheric stroke 2016, 19 (2):84 European Journal of Physiotherapyen
dc.identifier.issn2167-9169
dc.identifier.issn2167-9177
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/21679169.2016.1261367
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620321
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The aims of the study were to investigate respiratory movement patterns among patients with right versus left hemispheric stroke with emphasis on regularity of respiratory frequency and amplitude of movements during both quiet and voluntary deep breathing and to compare the results with reference values. Materials and methods: Eighteen patients with severe stroke were measured with the Respiratory Movement Measuring Instrument. Respiratory frequencies, movements, regularity of amplitude and frequency were compared with individuals with no neurological disease. Results: The demographics and physical performance were comparable for 8 left and 10 right hemispheric stroke. Deep respiratory movements were significantly decreased (p< 0.001) and frequency significantly increased (p< 0.03 for quiet and p = 0.002 for deep breathing), for the group (n = 18) compared with reference values. Fifty-six percent of our stroke patients had irregular amplitude of deep respiratory movements (p = 0.003), and 33% had irregular frequency (p = 0.058), but none of the individuals with no neurological diseases (p = 0.003). Seventy percent of RHS patients had irregular amplitude of deep respiratory movements, compared with 38% of LHS patients (p = 0.34). Conclusion: Results show significantly decreased amplitude of deep breathing in hemispheric stroke and indicate a possible effect on regularity of range and frequency of respiratory movements.
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland Icelandic Physotherapy Association research funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledge Journals, Taylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21679169.2016.1261367en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European Journal of Physiotherapyen
dc.subjectHeilablóðfallen
dc.subjectÖndunen
dc.subjectPTY12en
dc.subjectNEU12en
dc.subject.meshStrokeen
dc.subject.meshRespirationen
dc.titleIrregular amplitude and frequency of respiratory movements in hemispheric strokeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLandspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Physiotherapy, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 2 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Physiotherapyen
dc.rights.accessClosed - Lokaðen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physiotherapy, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland;
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Neurology, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physiotherapy, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland;
html.description.abstractObjectives: The aims of the study were to investigate respiratory movement patterns among patients with right versus left hemispheric stroke with emphasis on regularity of respiratory frequency and amplitude of movements during both quiet and voluntary deep breathing and to compare the results with reference values. Materials and methods: Eighteen patients with severe stroke were measured with the Respiratory Movement Measuring Instrument. Respiratory frequencies, movements, regularity of amplitude and frequency were compared with individuals with no neurological disease. Results: The demographics and physical performance were comparable for 8 left and 10 right hemispheric stroke. Deep respiratory movements were significantly decreased (p< 0.001) and frequency significantly increased (p< 0.03 for quiet and p = 0.002 for deep breathing), for the group (n = 18) compared with reference values. Fifty-six percent of our stroke patients had irregular amplitude of deep respiratory movements (p = 0.003), and 33% had irregular frequency (p = 0.058), but none of the individuals with no neurological diseases (p = 0.003). Seventy percent of RHS patients had irregular amplitude of deep respiratory movements, compared with 38% of LHS patients (p = 0.34). Conclusion: Results show significantly decreased amplitude of deep breathing in hemispheric stroke and indicate a possible effect on regularity of range and frequency of respiratory movements.


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