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dc.contributor.authorHauksson, Petur
dc.contributor.authorIngibergsdóttir, Sylvia
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdóttir, Thorunn
dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Inga Hrefna
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-25T10:48:21Z
dc.date.available2017-10-25T10:48:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-08
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.citationEffectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy for treatment-resistant depression with psychiatric comorbidity: comparison of individual versus group CBT in an interdisciplinary rehabilitation setting. 2017, 71 (6):465-472 Nord J Psychiatryen
dc.identifier.issn1502-4725
dc.identifier.pmid28598705
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/08039488.2017.1331263
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620322
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractCognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has been shown to be effective, yet there is a paucity of research on the differential effectiveness of individual and group CBT for adults with treatment-resistant depression with psychiatric comorbidity.
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the effectiveness of individual and group CBT for inpatients, in an interdisciplinary rehabilitation setting; the extent of psychiatric comorbidity; and who benefits the most from group CBT.
dc.description.abstractAll patients (n = 181) received 6 weeks of rehabilitation (treatment as usual, TAU). In addition, they were randomly allocated to group CBT (n = 86) or individual CBT (n = 59) combined with TAU, or TAU only (n = 36). All CBT therapists were part of an interdisciplinary team, had at least 1-year CBT training, and attended weekly supervision. The same CBT manual was used for individual and group therapy, providing 12 sessions, two per week. Groups had 12-15 participants and two therapists in each session.
dc.description.abstractIndividual CBT was superior in efficacy to group CBT and TAU, with a large within-subject effect size (ES = 2.10). Group CBT was not superior to TAU. The benefits of treatment decreased over time, but remained large at 18-month follow-up for individual CBT (ES = 1.02), and medium for group CBT (ES = 0.46) and TAU (ES = 0.60).
dc.description.abstractIndividual CBT was an effective addition to TAU and showed significant improvements in symptom severity post-treatment and at 18-month follow-up. Disorder severity and comorbidity may have decreased effectiveness of group therapy primarily aimed at depression.
dc.description.sponsorshipReykjalundur Research Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/08039488.2017.1331263?needAccess=trueen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nordic journal of psychiatryen
dc.subjectÞunglyndien
dc.subjectAtferlismeðferðen
dc.subjectHópmeðferðen
dc.subjectPSN12en
dc.subject.meshDepressionen
dc.subject.meshCognitive Therapyen
dc.subject.meshPsychotherapy, Groupen
dc.titleEffectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy for treatment-resistant depression with psychiatric comorbidity: comparison of individual versus group CBT in an interdisciplinary rehabilitation setting.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] VIRK Vocat Rehabil Fund, Assessment & Training Dept, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 2 ] Landspitali, Outpatient Psychiat Dept, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 3 ] Reykjalundur Rehabil Ctr, Psychol Serv, Mosfellsbaer, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalNordic journal of psychiatryen
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
dc.departmentcodePSN12
html.description.abstractCognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has been shown to be effective, yet there is a paucity of research on the differential effectiveness of individual and group CBT for adults with treatment-resistant depression with psychiatric comorbidity.
html.description.abstractTo investigate the effectiveness of individual and group CBT for inpatients, in an interdisciplinary rehabilitation setting; the extent of psychiatric comorbidity; and who benefits the most from group CBT.
html.description.abstractAll patients (n = 181) received 6 weeks of rehabilitation (treatment as usual, TAU). In addition, they were randomly allocated to group CBT (n = 86) or individual CBT (n = 59) combined with TAU, or TAU only (n = 36). All CBT therapists were part of an interdisciplinary team, had at least 1-year CBT training, and attended weekly supervision. The same CBT manual was used for individual and group therapy, providing 12 sessions, two per week. Groups had 12-15 participants and two therapists in each session.
html.description.abstractIndividual CBT was superior in efficacy to group CBT and TAU, with a large within-subject effect size (ES = 2.10). Group CBT was not superior to TAU. The benefits of treatment decreased over time, but remained large at 18-month follow-up for individual CBT (ES = 1.02), and medium for group CBT (ES = 0.46) and TAU (ES = 0.60).
html.description.abstractIndividual CBT was an effective addition to TAU and showed significant improvements in symptom severity post-treatment and at 18-month follow-up. Disorder severity and comorbidity may have decreased effectiveness of group therapy primarily aimed at depression.


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