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dc.contributor.authorThorsteinsdottir, Thordis
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsdottir, Heiddis
dc.contributor.authorHauksdottir, Arna
dc.contributor.authorStranne, Johan
dc.contributor.authorWilderäng, Ulrica
dc.contributor.authorHaglind, Eva
dc.contributor.authorSteineck, Gunnar
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-24T14:54:33Z
dc.date.available2017-11-24T14:54:33Z
dc.date.issued2017-11
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.citationCare-related predictors for negative intrusive thoughts after prostate cancer diagnosis-data from the prospective LAPPRO trial. 2017, 26 (11):1749-1757 Psychooncologyen
dc.identifier.issn1099-1611
dc.identifier.pmid28027422
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.4359
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620364
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractNegative intrusive thoughts about one's prostate cancer have been associated with depressive mood and impaired quality of life among prostate cancer patients. However, little is known about possible predictors for negative intrusive thoughts among this group. We aimed to identify health- and care-related predictors for such thoughts among a population of men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and undergoing radical prostatectomy.
dc.description.abstractIn the LAPPRO-trial, 3154 men (80%) answered study-specific questionnaires at admission and 3 months after surgery. Questions concerned socio-demographics, health, uncertainty, preparedness for symptoms, and the outcome-negative intrusive thoughts. Associations between variables were analyzed by log-binominal and multivariable approach.
dc.description.abstractThe strongest predictor of negative intrusive thoughts at admission to surgery was uncertainty of cure, followed by binge drinking, poor physical health, antidepressant medication, not being prepared for urinary symptoms, age under 55, and physical pain. Reporting it not probable to obtain urinary symptoms after surgery lowered the odds. Negative intrusive thoughts before surgery were the strongest predictor for such thoughts 3 months later followed by uncertainty of cure, physical pain, younger age, living alone, and poor self-reported physical health.
dc.description.abstractOur findings showed an association of preoperative uncertainty of cure as well as low preparedness for well-known surgery-induced symptoms with higher occurrence of negative intrusive thoughts about prostate cancer. Future studies should examine if interventions designed to have healthcare professionals inform patients about their upcoming prostatectomy reduce patients' negative intrusive thoughts and thereby, improve their psychological well-being.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pon.4359/epdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psycho-oncologyen
dc.subjectBlöðruhálskirtilskrabbameinen
dc.subjectBlöðruhálskirtillen
dc.subjectKrabbameinen
dc.subjectSkurðlækningaren
dc.subjectKvíðien
dc.subjectEAN12en
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychologicalen
dc.subject.meshProstatectomyen
dc.subject.meshAnxietyen
dc.titleCare-related predictors for negative intrusive thoughts after prostate cancer diagnosis-data from the prospective LAPPRO trial.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Div Clin Canc Epidemiol,Dept Oncol, Gothenburg, Sweden Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Fac Nursing, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 3 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Res Inst Emergency Care, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 4 ] Mt Sinai Sch Med, Dept Oncol Sci, New York, NY USA Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 5 ] Reykjavik Univ, Dept Psychol, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 6 ] Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 7 ] Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Urol, Gothenburg, Sweden Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 8 ] Univ Gothenburg, Dept Surg Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp Ostra,SSORG, Gothenburg, Sweden Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 9 ] Karolinska Inst, Div Clin Canc Epidemiol, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Swedenen
dc.identifier.journalPsycho-oncologyen
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
html.description.abstractNegative intrusive thoughts about one's prostate cancer have been associated with depressive mood and impaired quality of life among prostate cancer patients. However, little is known about possible predictors for negative intrusive thoughts among this group. We aimed to identify health- and care-related predictors for such thoughts among a population of men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and undergoing radical prostatectomy.
html.description.abstractIn the LAPPRO-trial, 3154 men (80%) answered study-specific questionnaires at admission and 3 months after surgery. Questions concerned socio-demographics, health, uncertainty, preparedness for symptoms, and the outcome-negative intrusive thoughts. Associations between variables were analyzed by log-binominal and multivariable approach.
html.description.abstractThe strongest predictor of negative intrusive thoughts at admission to surgery was uncertainty of cure, followed by binge drinking, poor physical health, antidepressant medication, not being prepared for urinary symptoms, age under 55, and physical pain. Reporting it not probable to obtain urinary symptoms after surgery lowered the odds. Negative intrusive thoughts before surgery were the strongest predictor for such thoughts 3 months later followed by uncertainty of cure, physical pain, younger age, living alone, and poor self-reported physical health.
html.description.abstractOur findings showed an association of preoperative uncertainty of cure as well as low preparedness for well-known surgery-induced symptoms with higher occurrence of negative intrusive thoughts about prostate cancer. Future studies should examine if interventions designed to have healthcare professionals inform patients about their upcoming prostatectomy reduce patients' negative intrusive thoughts and thereby, improve their psychological well-being.


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