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dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Sigridur
dc.contributor.authorZoëga, Sigridur
dc.contributor.authorSerlin, Ronald C
dc.contributor.authorSveinsdottir, Herdis
dc.contributor.authorHafsteinsdottir, Elin Johanna Gudrun
dc.contributor.authorFridriksdottir, Nanna
dc.contributor.authorGretarsdottir, Elfa Tholl
dc.contributor.authorWard, Sandra Evelyn
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-21T11:08:53Z
dc.date.available2017-12-21T11:08:53Z
dc.date.issued2017-10
dc.date.submitted2017
dc.identifier.citationThe effectiveness of the Pain Resource Nurse Program to improve pain management in the hospital setting: A cluster randomized controlled trial. 2017, 75:83-90 Int J Nurs Studen
dc.identifier.issn1873-491X
dc.identifier.pmid28759823
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2017.07.009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620415
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractThe Pain Resource Nurse program is a widely disseminated, evidence-based, nursing staff development program, designed to improve pain management in hospitals. The program has shown promising results, but has never been tested with a rigorous research design.
dc.description.abstractOur objective was to test the effectiveness of the Pain Resource Nurse program. Hypothesized outcomes included improvements in nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and assessment practices, and in patients' participation in decision-making, adequacy of pain management, pain severity, time spent in severe pain, pain interference, and satisfaction.
dc.description.abstractCluster randomized controlled trial.
dc.description.abstractA 650-bed university hospital in Iceland Participants: The sample consisted of a) patients ≥18 years of age, native speaking, hospitalized for at least 24h, alert and able to participate; and b) registered nurses who worked on the participating units.
dc.description.abstractTwenty three surgical and medical inpatient units were randomly assigned to the Pain Resource Nurse program (n=12) or to wait list control (n=11). The American Pain Society Outcome Questionnaire and the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey were used to collect data from patients and nurses respectively. Baseline data (T1) for patients were collected simultaneously on all units, followed by data collection from nurses. Then randomization took place, and the Pain Resource Nurse program was instituted. Ten months later, follow up (T2) data were collected, after which the nurses on the control group units received the Pain Resource Nurse program.
dc.description.abstractAt baseline, data were collected from 305 of the 396 eligible patients and at follow up from 326 of the 392 eligible patients, a 77% and 83% response rate respectively. At baseline, 232 of 479 eligible nurses responded and at follow-up 176 of the eligible 451 nurses responded, a 49% and 39% response rate, respectively. A nested mixed model analysis of covariance revealed that the intervention was successful in changing pain assessment practices, with pain assessment using standardized measures increasing from 13% to 25% in the intervention group while decreasing from 21% to 16% in the control group. None of the other hypothesized improvements were found.
dc.description.abstractThe Pain Resource Nurse program was successful in improving nurses' use of standardized measures for pain assessment. No effects were found on patient outcomes; pain was both prevalent and severe at both time points. Only minimal improvements were noted in response to this evidence-based staff development program. Changes in pain management practices remain a challenge in clinical settings.
dc.description.sponsorshipIcelandic Center for Research University of Iceland Research Fund Landspitali University Hospital Research Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPergamon Elsevier Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttps://ac.els-cdn.com/S002074891730161X/1-s2.0-S002074891730161X-main.pdf?_tid=bf7add72-e63c-11e7-8b9e-00000aab0f01&acdnat=1513853604_e939a7153f288eff60e028565ac80a9cen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of nursing studiesen
dc.subjectVerkjameðferðen
dc.subjectHjúkrunen
dc.subjectNAA12en
dc.subjectPEE12en
dc.subjectONC12en
dc.subjectOLD12en
dc.subject.meshPain Managementen
dc.subject.meshNursingen
dc.subject.meshStaff Developmenten
dc.titleThe effectiveness of the Pain Resource Nurse Program to improve pain management in the hospital setting: A cluster randomized controlled trial.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Eiriksgata 5, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 3 ] Univ Wisconsin, Madison, WI USAen
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of nursing studiesen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractThe Pain Resource Nurse program is a widely disseminated, evidence-based, nursing staff development program, designed to improve pain management in hospitals. The program has shown promising results, but has never been tested with a rigorous research design.
html.description.abstractOur objective was to test the effectiveness of the Pain Resource Nurse program. Hypothesized outcomes included improvements in nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and assessment practices, and in patients' participation in decision-making, adequacy of pain management, pain severity, time spent in severe pain, pain interference, and satisfaction.
html.description.abstractCluster randomized controlled trial.
html.description.abstractA 650-bed university hospital in Iceland Participants: The sample consisted of a) patients ≥18 years of age, native speaking, hospitalized for at least 24h, alert and able to participate; and b) registered nurses who worked on the participating units.
html.description.abstractTwenty three surgical and medical inpatient units were randomly assigned to the Pain Resource Nurse program (n=12) or to wait list control (n=11). The American Pain Society Outcome Questionnaire and the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey were used to collect data from patients and nurses respectively. Baseline data (T1) for patients were collected simultaneously on all units, followed by data collection from nurses. Then randomization took place, and the Pain Resource Nurse program was instituted. Ten months later, follow up (T2) data were collected, after which the nurses on the control group units received the Pain Resource Nurse program.
html.description.abstractAt baseline, data were collected from 305 of the 396 eligible patients and at follow up from 326 of the 392 eligible patients, a 77% and 83% response rate respectively. At baseline, 232 of 479 eligible nurses responded and at follow-up 176 of the eligible 451 nurses responded, a 49% and 39% response rate, respectively. A nested mixed model analysis of covariance revealed that the intervention was successful in changing pain assessment practices, with pain assessment using standardized measures increasing from 13% to 25% in the intervention group while decreasing from 21% to 16% in the control group. None of the other hypothesized improvements were found.
html.description.abstractThe Pain Resource Nurse program was successful in improving nurses' use of standardized measures for pain assessment. No effects were found on patient outcomes; pain was both prevalent and severe at both time points. Only minimal improvements were noted in response to this evidence-based staff development program. Changes in pain management practices remain a challenge in clinical settings.


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