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dc.contributor.authorJónasdóttir, Rannveig J.
dc.contributor.authorJónsdóttir, Helga
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsdottir, Berglind
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Gisli H.
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-05T11:24:26Z
dc.date.available2018-02-05T11:24:26Z
dc.date.issued2018-02
dc.identifier.citationPsychological recovery after intensive care: Outcomes of a long-term quasi-experimental study of structured nurse-led follow-up 2018, 44:59 Intensive and Critical Care Nursingen
dc.identifier.issn09643397
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.iccn.2017.06.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620447
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To compare psychological recovery of patients receiving structured nurse-led follow-up and patients receiving usual care after intensive care discharge. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental study. SETTING: Single centre, university hospital, mixed intensive care patient population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression measured three and four times over 12 months after intensive care discharge. Disturbing memories of the intensive care stay and psychological reactions (that one's life was in danger, threat to physical integrity, intense fear, helplessness, horror) three months after intensive care. A mixed effect model tested differences between the groups over time and regression model predicted post-traumatic stress at three months. RESULTS: The experimental group had significantly more symptoms of post-traumatic stress and anxiety than the control group over the 12 months. Patients from both groups had severe symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Patients with post-traumatic stress at three months had disturbing memories and psychological reactions. CONCLUSION: The structured nurse-led follow-up did not improve patients' measured outcomes of psychological recovery after intensive care. Patients with severe symptoms of post-traumatic stress are of concern. Emphasis needs to be placed on disturbing memories of the intensive care stay and psychological reactions when constructing intensive care nurse-led follow-up.
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali University Hospital Research Fund Icelandic Nurses Association Ingibjorg R. Magnusdottir Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Science Ltd.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0964339717300800en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Intensive and Critical Care Nursingen
dc.subjectÁfallastreitaen
dc.subjectGjörgæsluhjúkrunen
dc.subjectGjörgæslaen
dc.subjectPER12en
dc.subjectAAA12en
dc.subjectPSC12en
dc.subject.meshCritical Careen
dc.subject.meshStress Disorders, Post-Traumaticen
dc.subject.meshClinical Nursing Researchen
dc.titlePsychological recovery after intensive care: Outcomes of a long-term quasi-experimental study of structured nurse-led follow-upen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Nursing, Sch Hlth Sci, Eiriksgata 34, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 2 ] Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp, Intens Care Units, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 3 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Sch Hlth Sci, Vatnsmyrarvegur 16, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 4 ] Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp, Mental Hlth Serv, IS-101 Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalIntensive and Critical Care Nursingen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
dc.departmentcodePER12, AAA12, PSC12
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To compare psychological recovery of patients receiving structured nurse-led follow-up and patients receiving usual care after intensive care discharge. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental study. SETTING: Single centre, university hospital, mixed intensive care patient population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression measured three and four times over 12 months after intensive care discharge. Disturbing memories of the intensive care stay and psychological reactions (that one's life was in danger, threat to physical integrity, intense fear, helplessness, horror) three months after intensive care. A mixed effect model tested differences between the groups over time and regression model predicted post-traumatic stress at three months. RESULTS: The experimental group had significantly more symptoms of post-traumatic stress and anxiety than the control group over the 12 months. Patients from both groups had severe symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Patients with post-traumatic stress at three months had disturbing memories and psychological reactions. CONCLUSION: The structured nurse-led follow-up did not improve patients' measured outcomes of psychological recovery after intensive care. Patients with severe symptoms of post-traumatic stress are of concern. Emphasis needs to be placed on disturbing memories of the intensive care stay and psychological reactions when constructing intensive care nurse-led follow-up.


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