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dc.contributor.authorMaire, Raphael
dc.contributor.authorMallinson, Arthur
dc.contributor.authorCeyte, Hadrien
dc.contributor.authorCaudron, Sebastien
dc.contributor.authorVan Nechel, Christian
dc.contributor.authorBisdorff, Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorMagnusson, Mans
dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Hannes
dc.contributor.authorKingma, Herman
dc.contributor.authorPerrin, Philippe
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-07T13:21:04Z
dc.date.available2018-02-07T13:21:04Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-21
dc.identifier.citationDiscussion about Visual Dependence in Balance Control: European Society for Clinical Evaluation of Balance Disorders 2017, 13 (3):404 The Journal of International Advanced Otologyen
dc.identifier.issn13087649
dc.identifier.issn21483817
dc.identifier.doi10.5152/iao.2017.4344
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620457
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Filesen
dc.description.abstractThe executive committee of the European Society for the clinical evaluation of balance disorders meets annually to address equilibrium problems that are not well understood. This is a review paper on discussions in the latest meeting we held. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seeing patients with vestibular disorders who end up depending on visual information as part of their compensation process is a common clinical occurrence. However, this "visual dependence" can generate symptoms, which include nausea, sensations of imbalance, and anxiety. It is unclear how this develops, as symptoms can be widely variable from patient to patient. There are several triggering factors to this symptom set, and quantifying it in a given patient is extremely difficult Results: The committee agreed that the presence of this symptom set can be suggestive of vestibular pathology, but the pathology does not have to be present. As a result, there is no correlation between symptom severity and test results. CONCLUSION: Visual dependence can often be present in a patient, although little, if any, measurable pathology is present. It is important to emphasize that although we cannot accurately measure this with either standardized testing or pertinent questionnaires, "hypersensitive" patients have a genuine disease and their symptoms are not of psychiatric origin.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAVESen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.advancedotology.org/eng/makale/1132/96/Full-Texten
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of International Advanced Otologyen
dc.subjectJafnvægisskynen
dc.subjectSjónskynjunen
dc.subjectSjónen
dc.subjectOTO12en
dc.subject.meshPostural Balanceen
dc.subject.meshSensation Disordersen
dc.subject.meshVision Disordersen
dc.titleDiscussion about Visual Dependence in Balance Control: European Society for Clinical Evaluation of Balance Disordersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Lausanne Univ Hosp, Neurotol Unit, Clin Otolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Lausanne, Switzerland Show more [ 2 ] Vancouver Gen Hosp, Neurotol Unit, Vancouver, BC, Canada Show more [ 3 ] Univ British Columbia, Fac Med, Div Otolaryngol, Vancouver, BC, Canada Show more [ 4 ] Univ Lorraine, Dev Adaptat & Handicap 11, Fac Med, Villers Les Nancy, France [ 5 ] UFR STAPS, Villers Les Nancy, France Show more [ 6 ] Erasme Univ Hosp, Unit Neuroophthalmol, Brussels, Belgium [ 7 ] Emile Mayrisch Hosp, Dept Neurol, Esch Sur Alzette, Luxembourg Show more [ 8 ] Univ Hosp Lund, Dept Otorhinolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden Show more [ 9 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 10 ] Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Otorhinolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Clin Sci, Maastricht, Netherlands [ 11 ] Tomsk Res State Univ, Fac Phys, Tomsk, Russia Show more [ 12 ] Univ Hosp Nancy, Dept Pediat Otolaryngol, Vandoeuvre Les Nancy, Franceen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of International Advanced Otologyen
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
dc.departmentcodeOTO12
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T16:59:20Z
html.description.abstractThe executive committee of the European Society for the clinical evaluation of balance disorders meets annually to address equilibrium problems that are not well understood. This is a review paper on discussions in the latest meeting we held. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seeing patients with vestibular disorders who end up depending on visual information as part of their compensation process is a common clinical occurrence. However, this "visual dependence" can generate symptoms, which include nausea, sensations of imbalance, and anxiety. It is unclear how this develops, as symptoms can be widely variable from patient to patient. There are several triggering factors to this symptom set, and quantifying it in a given patient is extremely difficult Results: The committee agreed that the presence of this symptom set can be suggestive of vestibular pathology, but the pathology does not have to be present. As a result, there is no correlation between symptom severity and test results. CONCLUSION: Visual dependence can often be present in a patient, although little, if any, measurable pathology is present. It is important to emphasize that although we cannot accurately measure this with either standardized testing or pertinent questionnaires, "hypersensitive" patients have a genuine disease and their symptoms are not of psychiatric origin.


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