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dc.contributor.authorBrynjarsdottir, E. D.
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, M. I.
dc.contributor.authorSigmundsdottir, E.
dc.contributor.authorMöller, P. H.
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, G. H.
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-09T15:51:28Z
dc.date.available2018-02-09T15:51:28Z
dc.date.issued2018-02
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.citationProspective study on long-term outcome after abdominal surgery 2018, 62 (2):147 Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavicaen
dc.identifier.issn00015172
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/aas.13025
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620467
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Complications following major abdominal surgery are common and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to describe 1-year mortality and identify factors that influence adverse outcomes after abdominal surgery. METHODS: This prospective observational cohort study was performed in Landspitali University Hospital and included all adult patients undergoing abdominal surgery requiring > 24-h hospital admission over 13 months. The follow-up period was 60 days for complications and 24 months for mortality. RESULTS: Data were available for 1113 (99.5%) of the 1119 patients who fulfilled inclusion criteria. A total of 23% of patients had at least one underlying co-morbidity. Non-elective surgeries were 48% and 13% of the patients were admitted to ICU post-operatively. A total of 20% of patients developed complications. Mortality at 30 days, 1 and 2 years was 1.8%, 5.6%, and 8.3% respectively. One-year mortality for those admitted to ICU was 18%. The long-term survival of the individuals surviving 30 days was significantly worse than for an age- and gender-matched population control group. Independent predictors for 1-year mortality were age, pre-operative acute kidney injury and intermediate- or major surgery. CONCLUSION: Post-operative complication rates and mortality following abdominal surgery in Iceland were comparable or in the lower range of previously published outcomes, validating the utility of offering a full host of abdominal surgical services in geographically isolated region with a relatively small referral base.
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali The National University Hospital of Iceland Research Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/aas.13025en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavicaen
dc.subjectSkurðlækningaren
dc.subjectKviðarholen
dc.subjectLífslíkuren
dc.subjectDánarmeinen
dc.subjectSAM12en
dc.subjectAAA12en
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complicationsen
dc.subject.meshSurgical Procedures, Operativeen
dc.subject.meshSurvivalen
dc.subject.meshMortalityen
dc.subject.meshAbdomenen
dc.titleProspective study on long-term outcome after abdominal surgeryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Landspitali, Dept Internal Med, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 3 ] Duke Univ, Sch Med, Dept Anesthesiol, Durham, NC USA [ 4 ] Landspitali, Dept Anaesthesia & Intens Care Med, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 5 ] Landspitali, Dept Surg, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalActa Anaesthesiologica Scandinavicaen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Internal Medicine; Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Anesthesiology; Duke University School of Medicine; Durham NC USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine; Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Medicine; University of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Medicine; University of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland
dc.departmentcodeSAM12, AAA12
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Complications following major abdominal surgery are common and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to describe 1-year mortality and identify factors that influence adverse outcomes after abdominal surgery. METHODS: This prospective observational cohort study was performed in Landspitali University Hospital and included all adult patients undergoing abdominal surgery requiring > 24-h hospital admission over 13 months. The follow-up period was 60 days for complications and 24 months for mortality. RESULTS: Data were available for 1113 (99.5%) of the 1119 patients who fulfilled inclusion criteria. A total of 23% of patients had at least one underlying co-morbidity. Non-elective surgeries were 48% and 13% of the patients were admitted to ICU post-operatively. A total of 20% of patients developed complications. Mortality at 30 days, 1 and 2 years was 1.8%, 5.6%, and 8.3% respectively. One-year mortality for those admitted to ICU was 18%. The long-term survival of the individuals surviving 30 days was significantly worse than for an age- and gender-matched population control group. Independent predictors for 1-year mortality were age, pre-operative acute kidney injury and intermediate- or major surgery. CONCLUSION: Post-operative complication rates and mortality following abdominal surgery in Iceland were comparable or in the lower range of previously published outcomes, validating the utility of offering a full host of abdominal surgical services in geographically isolated region with a relatively small referral base.


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