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dc.contributor.authorDickerman, Barbra A.
dc.contributor.authorTorfadottir, Johanna E.
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsdottir, Unnur A.
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Kathryn M.
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, Laufey
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorBatista, Julie L.
dc.contributor.authorFall, Katja
dc.contributor.authorGiovannucci, Edward
dc.contributor.authorSigurdardottir, Lara G.
dc.contributor.authorTryggvadottir, Laufey
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.contributor.authorMarkt, Sarah C.
dc.contributor.authorMucci, Lorelei A.
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-13T11:09:45Z
dc.date.available2018-02-13T11:09:45Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-15
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.citationMidlife metabolic factors and prostate cancer risk in later life 2018, 142 (6):1166 International Journal of Canceren
dc.identifier.issn00207136
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ijc.31142
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620470
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractMetabolic syndrome is associated with several cancers, but evidence for aggressive prostate cancer is sparse. We prospectively investigated the influence of metabolic syndrome and its components on risk of total prostate cancer and measures of aggressive disease in a cohort of Icelandic men. Men in the Reykjavik Study (n = 9,097, enrolled 1967-1987) were followed for incident (n = 1,084 total; n = 378 advanced; n = 148 high-grade) and fatal (n = 340) prostate cancer until 2014. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for (1) measured metabolic factors at cohort entry (body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, triglycerides, fasting blood glucose) and (2) a metabolic syndrome score (range 0-4) combining the risk factors: BMI ≥30 kg/m2 ; systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥130 or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥85 mm Hg or taking antihypertensives; triglycerides ≥150 mg/dl; fasting blood glucose ≥100 mg/dl or self-reported type 2 diabetes. Hypertension and type 2 diabetes were associated with a higher risk of total, advanced, high-grade, and fatal prostate cancer, independent of BMI. Neither BMI nor triglycerides were associated with prostate cancer risk. Higher metabolic syndrome score (3-4 vs 0) was associated with a higher risk of fatal prostate cancer (HR 1.55; 95% CI: 0.89, 2.69; p trend = 0.08), although this finding was not statistically significant. Our findings suggest a positive association between midlife hypertension and diabetes and risk of total and aggressive prostate cancer. Further, metabolic syndrome as a combination of factors was associated with an increased risk of fatal prostate cancer.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health American Institute for Cancer Research Nordic HealthWhole Grain Food (HELGA) Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center SPORE in Prostate Canceren
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ijc.31142en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Canceren
dc.subjectBlöðruhálskirtilskrabbameinen
dc.subjectEfnaskiptasjúkdómaren
dc.subjectNUR12en
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndromeen
dc.titleMidlife metabolic factors and prostate cancer risk in later lifeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave,9th Floor, Boston, MA 02115 USA Show more [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 3 ] Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden Show more [ 4 ] Univ Hosp, Unit Nutr Res, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 5 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Food Sci & Nutr, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 6 ] Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland Show more [ 7 ] Orebro Univ Hosp, Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, Orebro, Sweden Show more [ 8 ] Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA Show more [ 9 ] Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA USA [ 10 ] Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA Show more [ 11 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 12 ] Iceland Canc Soc, Dept Educ & Prevent, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 13 ] Iceland Canc Registry, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Canceren
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Epidemiology; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Boston MA
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Epidemiology; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Boston MA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Epidemiology; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Boston MA
dc.contributor.institutionUnit for Nutrition Research, University Hospital & the Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition; University of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Epidemiology; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Boston MA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Epidemiology; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Boston MA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Epidemiology; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Boston MA
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionThe Icelandic Cancer Registry; Reykjavik Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionThe Icelandic Heart Association; Kopavogur Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Epidemiology; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Boston MA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Epidemiology; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Boston MA
dc.departmentcodeNUR12
html.description.abstractMetabolic syndrome is associated with several cancers, but evidence for aggressive prostate cancer is sparse. We prospectively investigated the influence of metabolic syndrome and its components on risk of total prostate cancer and measures of aggressive disease in a cohort of Icelandic men. Men in the Reykjavik Study (n = 9,097, enrolled 1967-1987) were followed for incident (n = 1,084 total; n = 378 advanced; n = 148 high-grade) and fatal (n = 340) prostate cancer until 2014. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for (1) measured metabolic factors at cohort entry (body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, triglycerides, fasting blood glucose) and (2) a metabolic syndrome score (range 0-4) combining the risk factors: BMI ≥30 kg/m2 ; systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥130 or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥85 mm Hg or taking antihypertensives; triglycerides ≥150 mg/dl; fasting blood glucose ≥100 mg/dl or self-reported type 2 diabetes. Hypertension and type 2 diabetes were associated with a higher risk of total, advanced, high-grade, and fatal prostate cancer, independent of BMI. Neither BMI nor triglycerides were associated with prostate cancer risk. Higher metabolic syndrome score (3-4 vs 0) was associated with a higher risk of fatal prostate cancer (HR 1.55; 95% CI: 0.89, 2.69; p trend = 0.08), although this finding was not statistically significant. Our findings suggest a positive association between midlife hypertension and diabetes and risk of total and aggressive prostate cancer. Further, metabolic syndrome as a combination of factors was associated with an increased risk of fatal prostate cancer.


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