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dc.contributor.authorLöve, Arthur
dc.contributor.authorBjörnsdottir, Thora B.
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, Sigurdur
dc.contributor.authorBjörnsson, Einar S.
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-24T13:06:19Z
dc.date.available2018-05-24T13:06:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-08
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.citationLow prevalence of hepatitis E in Iceland: a seroepidemiological study 2018, 53 (3):293 Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterologyen
dc.identifier.issn0036-5521
dc.identifier.issn1502-7708
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00365521.2017.1420218
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620567
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been reported to be more prevalent in the developed countries than previously thought. HEV infection is an important differential diagnosis in patients with drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The prevalence of hepatitis E was investigated in the general population of Iceland, among pig farmers and patients with DILI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Serum samples were tested for hepatitis E IgG, with two commercial ELISA tests: Diagnostic Bioprobes Srl. (Dia Pro) and the Wantai HEV IgG and subjects repeatedly reactive were tested with an immunoblot assay (RecomLINE). Three groups were tested: (1) healthy volunteers (HV), (2) pig farm workers (PFWs) and (3) patients participating in a nationwide prospective study on DILI. RESULTS: Overall 291 individuals were tested, HV (n = 195), PFW (n = 21) and DILI (n = 75). Only 6/291 (2.1%) tested positive for IgG antibodies to HEV in all three tests. Three HV were HEV IgG antibody positive and three in the DILI group. One PFW tested positive in the Dia Pro and Wantai tests but not in the immunoblot assay. All but one of the positive individuals in all three tests was either of foreign national origin or had spent extended period of time outside of Iceland. CONCLUSIONS: The seroprevalence of hepatitis E appears to be lower in Iceland than majority of recent studies in other western countries have demonstrated. This may be due to relative isolation and severe restriction on import of livestock from other countries.
dc.description.sponsorshipScience fund of the Landspitali-University Hospital Research Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00365521.2017.1420218en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterologyen
dc.subjectHepatitisen
dc.subjectVEI12en
dc.subjectPTT12en
dc.subjectGAS12en
dc.subject.meshHepatitis Een
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.titleLow prevalence of hepatitis E in Iceland: a seroepidemiological studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 2 ] Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Virol, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 3 ] Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Dept Internal Med, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian Journal of Gastroenterologyen
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland;
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Virology, The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland;
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland;
dc.departmentcodeVEI12, PTT12, GAS12
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been reported to be more prevalent in the developed countries than previously thought. HEV infection is an important differential diagnosis in patients with drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The prevalence of hepatitis E was investigated in the general population of Iceland, among pig farmers and patients with DILI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Serum samples were tested for hepatitis E IgG, with two commercial ELISA tests: Diagnostic Bioprobes Srl. (Dia Pro) and the Wantai HEV IgG and subjects repeatedly reactive were tested with an immunoblot assay (RecomLINE). Three groups were tested: (1) healthy volunteers (HV), (2) pig farm workers (PFWs) and (3) patients participating in a nationwide prospective study on DILI. RESULTS: Overall 291 individuals were tested, HV (n = 195), PFW (n = 21) and DILI (n = 75). Only 6/291 (2.1%) tested positive for IgG antibodies to HEV in all three tests. Three HV were HEV IgG antibody positive and three in the DILI group. One PFW tested positive in the Dia Pro and Wantai tests but not in the immunoblot assay. All but one of the positive individuals in all three tests was either of foreign national origin or had spent extended period of time outside of Iceland. CONCLUSIONS: The seroprevalence of hepatitis E appears to be lower in Iceland than majority of recent studies in other western countries have demonstrated. This may be due to relative isolation and severe restriction on import of livestock from other countries.


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